LETTERS FROM READERS, June 1934

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LETTERS FROM READERS

The International Trophy.

SIK,—The Junior Car Club are to be congratulated on staging a fine race for the benefit of the public, but they cannot be congratulated on their handicapping. To put a 746 c.c. machine on the same mark as a 2,000 c.c. Continental racing car of the latest type, costing five times as much, does not appear to me quite right.

However, the one thing which is to be deplored is the fact that tens of thousands of people who watched this race, and who did not know very much about motor cars, went away with the impression that only the foreigner can build a fast car. No English sportsman would want to see the smaller car—which is the only type of racing car this country produces— favoured at the expense of the larger Continental car, but it was obvious that the promoters of the race were determined that a foreign car should win. Considering that the donor of the principal prize was

the one man in England who started the “Buy British and be proud of it,” campaign, it would appear that the J.C.C. are a little lacking in tact to stage a race with the dice so heavily loaded from the very commencement against the British car. I am, yours, etc., J. MALCOLM McINTYRE. The Grove Cottage,

Radlett, Herts.

Road Accidents

SI R, —In his attempt to reduce accidents in built-up areas by imposing a 30 m.p.h. speed limit, can the Minister of Transport have considered this question : Which is responsible for more accidents, a fast car or a slow-moving vehicle, such as a tram ? There seems to be no doubt whatever that trams (which operate almost entirely in built-up areas) are the indirect cause of many accidents in which they them

selves are not directly involved. The main reason for this is that they are unable to draw in to the side of the road to set down or pick up passengers.

Quite apart from this aspect, many accidents occur when a motorist is passing a tram on the inside—as is required in most towns. A pedestrian thoughtlessly steps off the pavement and the motorist is unable to swerve because he is squeezed in by the tram . . . So far as built-up areas are concerned, the toll of the road will never be materially reduced while the menace of the trams

exists. If these effete vehicles were replaced by up-to-date transport throughout the country, the number of alleged motoring accidents would be reduced enormously. I am, yours, etc., G. G. HAYDEN,

Sales Manager. Triumph Company, Limited,

Coventry.