VW Notes

Author

admin

Browse pages
Current page

1

Current page

2

Current page

3

Current page

4

Current page

5

Current page

6

Current page

7

Current page

8

Current page

9

Current page

10

Current page

11

Current page

12

Current page

13

Current page

14

Current page

15

Current page

16

Current page

17

Current page

18

Current page

19

Current page

20

Current page

21

Current page

22

Current page

23

Current page

24

Current page

25

Current page

26

Current page

27

Current page

28

Current page

29

Current page

30

Current page

31

Current page

32

Current page

33

Current page

34

Current page

35

Current page

36

Current page

37

Current page

38

Current page

39

Current page

40

Current page

41

Current page

42

Current page

43

Current page

44

Current page

45

Current page

46

Current page

47

Current page

48

Current page

49

Current page

50

Current page

51

Current page

52

Current page

53

Current page

54

Current page

55

Current page

56

Current page

57

Current page

58

Current page

59

Current page

60

Current page

61

Current page

62

Current page

63

Current page

64

Current page

65

Current page

66

Current page

67

Current page

68

Current page

69

Current page

70

Current page

71

Current page

72

Current page

73

Current page

74

Current page

75

Current page

76

Current page

77

Current page

78

Current page

79

Current page

80

Current page

81

Current page

82

Current page

83

Current page

84

Current page

85

Current page

86

Current page

87

Current page

88

Current page

89

Current page

90

Current page

91

Current page

92

The Elmer A. Sperry Award, awarded annually to commemorate the memory of one of America’s greatest inventors, by the American Institute of Electrical Engineers, the Society of Automotive Engineers and the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, was presented in New York late last year to Dr. Heinz Nordhoff in honour of the late Dr. Porsche and the workers in the VW factory. Never before has this award been made to an automobile manufacturer or, indeed, outside the States. The citation reads: “To Dr. Ferdinand Porsche (in memoriam), Dr. Heinz Nordhoff, and their co-workers in Volkswagenwerk for the development of the Volkswagen automobile, which, in concept, engineering design and production, has made available to the world, an automobile of small size for multiple uses, with unique attributes of universality; of low initial and operating costs; of simplicity of design having ease of maintenance; comfort with adequate performance; and suitable for rural and urban use.”

Although Dr. Nordhoff denies that a new VW is shortly to be introduced, stating that “it is more important to me to give people good value, instead of following a group of hysterical stylists,” American motor papers have been publishing suggestions as to lines he might follow. Road & Track and now Motor Trend have illustrated possible lines for a new VW. In their May issue Road & Track predicts that, if a new VW comes, it will be a five-seater Karmann-Ghia saloon on the existing platform chassis, with the engine enlarged to about 1,390 c.c. By using larger valves 50 b.h.p. and 80 m.p.h. top speed are envisaged. A synchromesh bottom gear is specified, and it is known that Wolfsburg have this modification in hand and are experimenting with an automatic clutch. Hydraulic or rod, instead of cable, clutch control is also believed to be in hand. Road & Track specify detail changes and even visualise a cheaper version of the famous “beetle,” using a flat-twin two-stroke engine. However, all this, except the synchromesh first gear and improved clutch operation, is pure speculation. Although VW are selling over 550,000 vehicles a year they cannot catch up with world demand.

*

At this stage we would not venture a comparison between the brilliant new Triumph Herald, only British family car with i.r.s., and the Volkswagen, which has had i.r.s. since 1936, partly for fear of being dubbed unpatriotic and partly because we have not yet completed a road-test of the British car. But it is of interest to see how staunch VW enthusiasts regard the Triumph Herald and we cannot do better than reproduce the views of a contributor to the May issue of Beetling, the journal of the Volkswagen Owners’ Club of Great Britain:

“A certain new small English family car has recently been introduced as offering something new in motoring. New, eh? Well, let’s see what its got. Some of the features seem oddly familiar, so I think a few gentle comparisons might reassure us that we don’t have to get out the For Sale notices yet.

“That independent rear end — someone in the design department has obviously slipped up here and let this creep in somehow. No doubt one of the brighter accessory boys will now come up with a gadget to convert this to a rigid axle and stop the funny swing-axles moving up and down!

“Separate chassis — well, box frame members or VW-type platform, it all means much the same to me.

“Cruising speed: 60 m.p.h. Unfortunately that poor engine is doing a mere 4,500 r.p.m. at this rate of knots. I daren’t think what it’s doing at 68 m.p.h.

“Now those adjustable-for-angle seats are a good idea. Let’s hope they are as comfortable as ours, for they seem a little on the small side; and as for the one at the back — well that is several inches narrower and comes complete with wheel-arch bulges!

“Brakes have two 7-in. and two 8-in. drums. There’s nothing like variety you know, but four 9-in. ones would seem to offer better retardation. Of course, with those tiny 13-in. wheels it must be rather difficult to achieve anything larger.

“Average fuel consumption tested at 36 m.p.g. Well, folks, we can do better than that. Press-button catches on the quarter-vent — Uh! Uh! No rheostat-controlled instrument light, though. What! no-fuses? Built-in heater (water for same can be had as a free extra). An additional 1½ cwt. unladen — they’re welcome to that. Petrol reserve — good. [But in the boot, whereas you can work the VW’s tap with the left foot. — Ed.]

“Acceleration. I see that comparative reports from the same source suggest we should just be able to show it a clean pair of swing-axles at the lights. (The couple more b.h.p. available must be lost in driving the water pump!) [Surely the Herald is over 1 cwt. heavier? — Ed.]

“So, remember, you too can have all the above for only £14 cheaper.

“P.S.—I am envious, though, of that 25-foot turning circle and no grease points. What about it, Wolfsburg?

Correction

The Editor of the Oldham Evening Chronicle, referring us to the item headed “Mistaken Identity” on page 353 of last month’s issue, points out that his paper did not carry a picture of an A55 in mistake for one of the Morris Oxford series V. The correct Morris Oxford picture was used, and we apologise for suggesting that the Oldham Evening Chronicle had used a wrong picture, which was not so. It seems that newsprint can change the appearance of the Morris Oxford radiator grille and make it look like the almost identical grille of an A55, which, while the newspaper in question is completely exonerated, does, as we said, emphasise the close simularity between modern B.M.C. products!