A spectator at Goodwood

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100

Sir.

In the May issue of your unique journal you say that Goodwood on Easter Monday was “proficiently organised.”

Had you been on the north side of Lavant at about 3.40 p.m. undoubtedly other more apt and infintely less polite words would have been used, assuming that you were not apoplectic!

A “Lyons Maid” van of large proportions slowly, deliberately and dangerously endeavoured to force its way through the thick crowd at that time. When halted by an immovable sea of bodies, it then endeavoured to drive up the banking, naturally tilting over at what seemed a most alarming angle as it did so. It ran over at least one person’s belongings, (possibly others, too, but vision was very restricted downwards due to the crowd), and eventually gave up and backed down again. By this time some intrepid and frustrated persons who couldn’t see anything climbed on top. Meanwhile the “100” had started, and you can imagine how much of the first laps I saw with this grinning madman grinding inexorably towards me. Nothing daunted, he again drove forward a few more yards on the level (with people on the roof) before being forced to a halt again by the thickness of the crowd, completely blocking my view. You should try watching motor racing through a very solid ice-cream van to know how I felt. Where he thought he was going I cannot fathom.

That, for me and many others, was the Goodwood “100” 1960 – an interesting race apparently, but I didn’t see much of it. Excellent value for my ticket money?

I am, Yours, etc.,

Bromley. – D. C. Voysey.

[This just shows that race organisers must have eyes in the back of their heads if they are to please everyone, but, knowing John Morgan, we doubt if the B.A.R.C. will let this happen again. – Ed.]

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