Another tale of woe

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admin

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Sir,

Your readers may be interested to know that the British motor industry does not have a monopoly in the production of motor cars that rattle and disintegrate soon after leaving the showroom.

Late last year my mother was so ill-advised as to purchase a new Simca “Etoile.” Within three weeks, rust was showing through the paint. This was rectified without demur. The car has persistently shed its left-hand windscreen wiper, and has developed a loud rattle which has defied the diagnostic efforts of at least two garages. The car is now impounded by the dealer while the Dodge Company at Kew makes up its mind what to do about this British-assembled continental lemon. Her last-but-one car was a VW. This went very well, but after 24,000 miles the synchromesh on second gear had gone on strike and the heater, which has always given a smell of hot oil whenever the car was driven hard, filled the car with exhaust fumes. Both cars were so well sealed that it was necessary to open a window before shutting a door. Surely all cars with this pestilential feature should have some form of venting valve.

I am, Yours, etc.,

Yelverton. – J. A. Heath Thompson.

[Opening a window before being able to shut a door is surely a small penalty to pay for efficient dust-sealing and the exclusion of water – even when afloat? – Ed.]