Book reviews, June 1961, June 1961

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An unusual book is “What’s Where in London,” written by Denys Parsons and published by Kenneth Mason Publications Ltd, price 6s. The book sets out to give likely sources of supply for unusual commodities such as kangaroo soup, stuffed otters, skeletons, false moustaches, left-hand pen nibs, goat’s milk, fried silkworms, rattlesnake meat, and so on, and where one can get repairs done, or where you can hire a private detective or a bulletproof waistcoat. The motoring section is rather small and will not tell the enthusiast much that he does not already know but this book is worth having for the multitude of objects it covers.