The truth about the Windsor

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Sir,

The Windsor was produced in the early 1920s by James Bartle & Co, Ltd, of Lancaster Road, Notting Hill, London, W, and was so named after the managing director of that company— Mr Windsor. The designer was one Fairbrother who was previously with Sizaire Berwick. In point of fact, FW Berwick for some time ran the sales side of the company. The head tester was KB Cater, a most capable man who was later replaced by RC Glazier.

The first engine was built by AF Milne, who is now an employee of Dickens & Jose Motors Ltd. The complete car including body being manufactured by James Bartle & Co. Ltd, who were well known in the coach-building trade, and also as ironfounders and bridge-builders.

The writer was for some time on the road-test side of the company, and enclosed herewith is a photograph taken on chassis test, which may be of interest to some of your readers; the picture being taken at Preston Road, Wembley, in the early 20s.

The Windsor was a first class product with what in those days was an excellent performance. Fuel consumption as tested was 44.4 mpg. Probably the foregoing reference to Sizaire Berwick will explain the similarity in radiators, as the SB was a larger version as regards frontal appearance.

JW Dickens. Ealing, W.13