The Summer

Browse pages
Current page

1

Current page

2

Current page

3

Current page

4

Current page

5

Current page

6

Current page

7

Current page

8

Current page

9

Current page

10

Current page

11

Current page

12

Current page

13

Current page

14

Current page

15

Current page

16

Current page

17

Current page

18

Current page

19

Current page

20

Current page

21

Current page

22

Current page

23

Current page

24

Current page

25

Current page

26

Current page

27

Current page

28

Current page

29

Current page

30

Current page

31

Current page

32

Current page

33

Current page

34

Current page

35

Current page

36

Current page

37

Current page

38

Current page

39

Current page

40

Current page

41

Current page

42

Current page

43

Current page

44

Current page

45

Current page

46

Current page

47

Current page

48

Current page

49

Current page

50

Current page

51

Current page

52

Current page

53

Current page

54

Current page

55

Current page

56

Current page

57

Current page

58

Current page

59

Current page

60

Current page

61

Current page

62

Current page

63

Current page

64

Current page

65

Current page

66

Current page

67

Current page

68

Current page

69

Current page

70

Current page

71

Current page

72

Current page

73

Current page

74

Current page

75

Current page

76

Current page

77

Current page

78

Current page

79

Current page

80

Current page

81

Current page

82

Current page

83

Current page

84

Current page

85

Current page

86

Current page

87

Current page

88

Current page

89

Current page

90

Current page

91

Current page

92

Current page

93

Current page

94

Current page

95

Current page

96

Current page

97

Current page

98

Current page

99

Current page

100

Current page

101

Current page

102

Current page

103

Current page

104

Current page

105

Current page

106

Current page

107

Current page

108

Current page

109

Current page

110

Current page

111

Current page

112

Current page

113

Current page

114

Current page

115

Current page

116

Current page

117

Current page

118

Current page

119

Current page

120

Current page

121

Current page

122

Current page

123

Current page

124

Current page

125

Current page

126

Current page

127

Current page

128

Current page

129

Current page

130

Current page

131

Current page

132

Current page

133

Current page

134

Current page

135

Current page

136

Current page

137

Current page

138

Current page

139

Current page

140

Frazer Nash by David Thirlby. 206 pp. 91 in. x 7 in. (G. T. Foulis & Co. Ltd., Sparkford, Yeovil, Somerset, BA 22 7JJ, £5.95).

If so many people find the Rolls-Royce irresistible, I find Frazer Nashes (and their forerunners, the G.N.s) absolutely fascinating. And so, I know, do all the “Chain Gang”. So this second book about all the sporting G.N., Frazer Nash, and relevant BMW cars is very welcome. It breathes the spirit of the late Capt. Archie Frazer-Nash and the late Ron Godfrey, and of course, of the Aldington brothers, who conceived, sold and raced these inimitable creations. Thirlby’s first, definite work on the subject (less BMW) was about the cars themselves. This new book is about the personalities and the motor-cars.

The book is nicely got up, although the many pictures, some 200 in all, are rather sepia in quality. The great point is having so many fine illustrations between two covers. The book contains reproductions of old advertisements, pages from the contemporary Press, and has a fine colour dust-jacket depicting three generations of Frazer Nash 1922, 1934 and 1952, cleverly taken by the author himself. If some of the pictures within have appeared before, this is inevitable, but some are new, and exceedingly worth having. The text absolutely exhudes Frazer Nash lure, conveyed in David’s dry, humourous style. A few items may raise the eyebrows of the purists, who may bravely contest them; but the book is packed with technical data, as the history of these so sporting makes unfolds, and it is nice to have the story brought right up to the modern, Bristol-engined ‘Nashes, ending with the V8 BMW-engined Continental and including the remarkable Austin-components era.

There are too many excellent things in “Frazer Nash” to quote individually. But I especially liked the story of Bill Aldington using a German picture of a lhd 319/1 BMW in his own advertisements by the simple expedient of printing it back-to-front, to show a rhd car (!) and John Teague’s theory that to go from minor to major output in two years BMW may have used the Opel 12 (or Vauxhall 12) engine, for the Type 55 BMW and probably the Opel transmission as well, is an important exposure. One feels that Thirlby has put all the anecdotes and pictures he especially likes into his book; he has been a little slap-happy in places, though. For instance, the picture on page 30 cannot be of Cushman in the 1920 Scottish Six-Days Trials, because no GNs competed (my feeling is that it is Harbutt, in another trial) and the 1936 TT, in which Fane’s 328 BMW finished 3rd, was run at Ards, not Dundrod.

You cannot have too much of Frazer Nash; buy this dose before it goes out of print! W.B.

Related articles

Related products