FIXING THE FIXTURES

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FIXING THE FIXTURES

Although the R.A.C. makes a practice of arranging dates at the beginning of each season, this does not entirely obviate the clashing of important fixtures. In spite of there being far too many races, there is little compensation for drivers, spectators, and organisers in the knowledge that, whereas two important events are scheduled for the same day, on another week-end when individuals are itching to ” dice,” watch or wave flags, as the case may be, there is yet no big event to attend.

Elsewhere we deal with the clash between the J.C.C. and the Irish Motor Racing Club over the August Bank-Holiday fixtures. This matter is further complicated by reason of the B.A.R.C. also having a very definite claim on this important date, so that it appears that even if the I.M.R.C. defeats the J.C.C. it will still be powerless to prevent the B.A.R.C. putting on a race —for instance over the new road course—that will attract exactly the same sort of cars that would run at Limerick. Indeed, the Limerick race has been run on this date very much at the mercy of the B.A.R.C.’s attitude. Another clash has occurred over the dates of the R.A.C. Isle of Man Car Race and the first Shelsley Walsh Hill-Climb. Both are extremely important events, the existence of which was known long before the 1937 Fixture List had even to be considered, and the subsequent clash seems to be due to apathetic handling of the situation, perhaps by both parties. Referring to the J.C.C. v I.M.R.C. clash, a writer in ” Speed ” points out that the former club has not yet indicated what type of cars will be eligible for this year’s International Trophy Race, which in his opinion renders the Irish Opposition a little premature. Even if the J.C.C. race were a sports-car contest, however,

the Limerick Race would be likely to suffer to some extent from reduced entries, and we feel that the Irish opposition wotild only be completely unjustified if no alternative dates were available—which is not the case.

That the B.A.R.C., docked of the J.C.C. fixture, might stage an even more opposing fixture, in lieu of its traditional short races, does not affect the argument. The R.A.C. works in admirable fashion in the sphere of safety-first in motor sport. Is it too much to ask that those who arrange the annual fixture list will attempt to come into line with their colleagues in other depart

ments ? Apart from drivers and spectators, all the persons who hope to benefit by allowing a race to be held in their particular district deserve consideration and fair play.

For this very reason the purely selfish outlook of race-goers in this country, that the Weybridge and Worcestershire fixtures should receive prior consideration, cannot be tolerated. Once again one is forced to ask whether there are not far too many important races in the British calendar

Fewer events would result in less flurry, more prize money, better entries, and a publicity value increasing in direct relation to the reduction in fixtures.

While on the subject, we also suggest that the R.A.C. takeF steps to ensure that only re sponsible people organise and officiate at trials and similar contests and formulate the results of such events. Unlike sports in which balls are sliced at or stuffed rabbits chased, motoring events have a strong influence on the fortunes of commercial enterprises, and casually prepared results can be a cause of serious trouble, apart from the bad sportsmanship displayed.

W. BODDY.