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Sir,

As an ardent ” Aston ” fan, I was greatly interested in Innes-Hunter’s article on the early Aston-Martin days, but I must contest the inference in his con’ eluding paragraph that the production model 2-litre was a ” tinny ” thing, constructed of undesirable proprietary parts. I bought my 2-litre in 1937, and this particular chassis was lit led with a 2/8seater drophead coupe by Abbotts, of Farnham. I believe only three of these bodies were ever const meted, and the car, asI had it then, was used as a business hack and also for sport. The only fault I had to find with any of the components was the hydraulic shockers on the back axle, which never functioned, and fed oil via the dash control on to one’s only pair of Sunday trousers.

A considerable mileage was ‘c..overed during the two years I owned this car, and except for normal maintenance and decokes, etc., it cost me but a few coppers during this time. Owing to the heavier body, the acceleration was naturally inferior to the standard open k/4-seater, but with the exception of a scrap with Porter-Hargreaves’s blown ” Ulster,” I was never beaten by any of the 1i-litres that I met on the road, I could almost get 85 on the clock, and the best timed speed was 79 during the J.C.C. High Speed trial at Brooklands. when, on this occasion, a strong west wind was blowing and it was snowing bard.

To digress a moment, I have often wondered what happened to this blown ” Ulster,” as the only time I saw it stationary was in a hotel car park during one of the 1938 Shelsley meetings, and from the large bulge in the off side of the bonnet I gathered that a belt-driven, lowpressure blower had been fitted by the owner himself. I also remember seeing the blown model referred to by TunesHunter at a Crystal Palace meeting with large cover between the front dumbirons, similar to the 44-litre blower Bentley, although it was possible that the blower had at this time been removed. The Girling brakes fitted to the 2-litre

were excellent and never needed adjustment, the body was unique in that it seated three in comfort (the third seat was placed transversely behind the existing two seats) and the hood could be lowered and raised whilst the car was in motion, and, unlike nearly all drophead bodies, it remained silent.

Most enthusiasts deplore the passing of their favourite model, and I was equally concerned when I recently read the announcement that the existing 2-litre would be replaced after the war by another model. Where, for instance, would ” Aldy ” be if he had stuck to the original Frazer-Nash, and bow wise was his choice in deciding to replace it with the B.M.W. range. No, it is best for us that the manufacturer does not become selfcentred about these things.

In spite of an intense interest in a more potent production of Continental manufacture I shall always retain a real affection for these cars, irrespective of models, and can only add that it is one of my ambitions to re-purchase, if possible, one clay, the 2/3-seater that I sold at the beginning of hostilities.

In conclusion, I am confident that any production of Mr. Sutherland’s that leaves the Feltham works will maintain the reputation of quality that has always been associated with the Aston-Martin, and long may he reign. I am, Yours, etc.,

B. W. J. HiNnEs, A.M.I.A.E. Windsor.

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