Reports of recent events, March 1952

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56

S.M.M.T. Formulae

The Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders announce that agreement has now been reached by car manufacturers on the definitions of production touring and production sports cars which should be considered eligible for production car races, rallies, etc.

The definitions were drafted by a Sub-Committee of the Society’s Car Section Committee under the chairmanship of WH Aldington, of AFN Ltd; and after they had been agreed by the Car Manufacturers Committee were discussed with a delegation representing the Competitions Committee of the RAC.

General agreement was reached after slight amendment of the definitions as drafted, and it is understood they will be used for the BRDC Production Car Races at Silverstone this year and for the RAC Second International Rally of Great Britain.

In drafting the definitions, the Sub-Committee had in mind the idea that production car races and rallies should afford the man in the street an opportunity to see “his” car (or the one he may get after his bathchair has been delivered–Ed) running under competition conditions, with little or no modification to the standard models available to the public. This is why the definitions seek to prohibit “freaks” or experimental prototypes from running in either category.

The full definitions as published by the SMMT follow: Suggested definitions adopted by British car manufacturers for application to cars to be entered for production car races, rallies, etc.

Production sports cars A–General 1. To be classed as a sports car, at least 25 of the model concerned must have been produced, or provision must have been made for the production of at least 25. Manufacturers may be required to furnish proof of such production or plans to representatives of the organising club in the form or a certificate from a qualified auditor, and may be required to permit inspection of their factories if desired. 2. All cars should be catalogued and shall have bodies complying with Appendix C to the FIA Regulations. 3. No car which is supercharged may be classed as a production sports car. 4. Entrants for events should be required to produce a catalogue issued by the manufacturer listing the model concerned. 5. All cars entered for events must conform in detail with the exceptions given below, to the manufacturers’ catalogue specification for that particular model.

B–Differentiation of Classes: Cars should be required to compete in various classes based on engine capacity only. (Surely price classes, if practical, are more logical? Ed)

C–Engine All engines must conform to the manufacturers catalogue specifications, but freedom as to the jets and chokes used may be granted. Modifications catalogued by the manuffietarer may be permitted, provided at least 25 sets of such modifications have been produced or provisioned for, and a certificate similar to that referred to in Clause A (1) above may be required in respect of these, or inspection of the manufacturer’s factory requested. [All depends what you mean by “provisioned for” Ed).

D–Wheels and Tyres: Only standard wheels and rims as catalogued for the model concerned may be used. Entrants may be given freedom as to the make and size of tyre used.

E–Electrical Equipment: All electrical equipment other than plugs must conform to the catalogue specifications, but any additional equipment which does not replace original electrical equipment may be permitted.

F–Weight: Cars must not weigh less than manufacturers’ declared unladen weight for the model concerned (In our experience they usually weigh more! Ed).

G–Fuel: The type of fuel to be permitted should be at the discretion of the club organising the event, but should not normally exceed 80 octane.

H–Windscreens: Windscreens shall conform to Appendix C to the FIA Regulations.

Production Touring Cars A–General 1. To be classed as a touring car, at least 250 of the model concerned must have been produced, or provision must have been made for the production of at least 250. Manufacturers may be required to furnish proof of such production or plans to representatives of the organising club in the form of a certificate from a qualified auditor, and may be required to permit inspection of their factories if desired. 2. All cars shall have a saloon body with a fixed top which is not dismountable and a minimum of two doors, and winding or sliding windows. 3. All cars should be catalogued and marketed as not less than four-seater touring cars, but cars of up to 750 cc may be permitted to have two seats only. 4. No car which is supercharged may be claimed as a production touring car. 5. Entrants for events should be required to produce a catalogue issued by the manufacturer listing the model concerned. 6. All cars entered for events must conform in detail, with the exceptions given below, to the manufacturers’ catalogue specification for that particular model.

B–Body Dimensions: All cars catalogued and marketed as four-seaters must be able to accommodate a minimum of four adults in reasonable comfort at the same time. Cars up to 750 cc must be able to accommodate two adults in reasonable comfort at the same time.

C–Differetiation of Classes: Cars should be required to compete in various classes based on engine capacity only. (Our comment on sports cars applies only more so. Ed)

D–Engine: All engines must conform to the manufacturer’s catalogue specifications, but freedom as to the jets and chokes used may be granted.

E–Wheels and Tyres: Only standard wheels and rims as catalogned for the model concerned may be used. Entrants may he given freedom as to the make and size of tyre used.

F–Electrical Equipment: All electrical equipment other than plugs must conform to the catalogue specifications, but any additional equipment which does not replace original electrical equipment may he permitted.

G–Weight: Cars must not weigh less than manufacturers’ declared unladen weight for the model concerned.

H–Fuel: The type of fuel to be permitted should he at the discretion of the club organising the event, but should not normally exceed 80 octane. [At Le Mans and elsewhere “prototype” sports cars are admitted, so if these SMMT proposals are adopted here all classes would seem to be catered for. Ed]

“Chevrolet speed equipment,” by California Bill. 15 pages, 25 cents. (California Bill, Los Angeles.) Curiously, this arrived by the same post as the Clymer “hop-up” books reviewed on page 137. It is really a catalogue of California Bill equipment and therefore the remarkable thing is that Bill charges for it. We love the item which reads: “Polished side panel. This cast aluminium side plate is great. You should have one on your Chevvy just to make it look fast even if it isn’t.”

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