Rootes Group luncheon

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A distinguished gathering of Motor Trade personalities for-gathered at the Dorchester Hotel on Tuesday, February 17th. A most excellent lunch was served in true Dorchester style — and the company was in keeping with the lunch.

Sir William Rootes, in his speech, announced that this was the 21st birthday party of the world-renowned Minx. He traced the development and history of this British family car through the two decades of motoring. He was confident that British manufacturers were holding their own in overseas markets — as far as the Rootes Group were concerned the prospects in the U.S.A., Australia and the Caribbean seemed fairly hopeful.

When the 21st birthday cake was “cut” to a fanfare by four Household Cavalry trumpeters in gleaming array — out rolled the Minx “Anniversary” — which was a most delightful looking motor car. This was followed by the Minx “Californian” — which has been designed for the American market. The last show piece was the Minx “Station Wagon” — this, we understood, is in very short supply. —J. N.