Movie marathon

Browse pages
Current page

1

Current page

2

Current page

3

Current page

4

Current page

5

Current page

6

Current page

7

Current page

8

Current page

9

Current page

10

Current page

11

Current page

12

Current page

13

Current page

14

Current page

15

Current page

16

Current page

17

Current page

18

Current page

19

Current page

20

Current page

21

Current page

22

Current page

23

Current page

24

Current page

25

Current page

26

Current page

27

Current page

28

Current page

29

Current page

30

Current page

31

Current page

32

Current page

33

Current page

34

Current page

35

Current page

36

Current page

37

Current page

38

Current page

39

Current page

40

Current page

41

Current page

42

Current page

43

Current page

44

Current page

45

Current page

46

Current page

47

Current page

48

Current page

49

Current page

50

Current page

51

Current page

52

Current page

53

Current page

54

Current page

55

Current page

56

Current page

57

Current page

58

Current page

59

Current page

60

On February 11th we had the unique experience of watching some five hours of motoring films, first at the V.S.C.C. Film Show at Hammersmith Town Hall, then, after a quick flit through traffic-free London thoroughfares in a Fiat 500, to the B.A.R.C. Midnight Matinée at the Curzon Cinema. It is a significant measure of the continuing enthusiasm for motor-racing that on the same evening two large audiences should be drawn to such films—and the Midnight Matinée is given three times over, of course. Leaving after the Shell-Mex & B.P. film  “Looking Ahead” had started at the V.S.C.C. Show, we were able to see it all through at The Curzon, within less than an hour of our enforced interruption. Incidentally, we were also able to appreciate, seeing this and the Shell Film Unit’s “Le Mans 1952” twice over, how much improvement there is in the modern projecting apparatus at The Curzon over the vintage appliances used at Hammersmith!

Everyone is agreed, surely, that Shell’s Le Mans film, directed by Bill Mason, is quite the best motor racing documentary yet, but their film of last year’s Farnborough Air Show reached an exceedingly high standard and then there was Habershon’s friendly Castrol film.  Rootes’ Technicolor of the Humber Snipe’s five countries in four days run was interesting, particularly from the viewpoint of noticing how spotlessly clean car and even number plates kept on this mid-winter dice!  The sound-track gave Leslie Johnson away when he nearly referred to the car as a Sunbeam-Talbot, but then all modern cars are so very much alike, aren’t they ?

Curiously, no historic films were included, even at the V.S.C.C. Show (unless at the very end, as we sped Curzonwards) but the B.A.R.C. again trumped up its bathing beauties—we must tap John Morgan for a fixture list of these contests sometime. Altogether, two excellent shows, well worth seeing in spite of the arrival home at 3.30 a.m. — W.B.