Book Reviews, March 1954, March 1954

Author

W.B.

Browse pages
Current page

1

Current page

2

Current page

3

Current page

4

Current page

5

Current page

6

Current page

7

Current page

8

Current page

9

Current page

10

Current page

11

Current page

12

Current page

13

Current page

14

Current page

15

Current page

16

Current page

17

Current page

18

Current page

19

Current page

20

Current page

21

Current page

22

Current page

23

Current page

24

Current page

25

Current page

26

Current page

27

Current page

28

Current page

29

Current page

30

Current page

31

Current page

32

Current page

33

Current page

34

Current page

35

Current page

36

Current page

37

Current page

38

Current page

39

Current page

40

Current page

41

Current page

42

Current page

43

Current page

44

Current page

45

Current page

46

Current page

47

Current page

48

Current page

49

Current page

50

Current page

51

Current page

52

Current page

53

Current page

54

Current page

55

Current page

56

Current page

57

Current page

58

Current page

59

Current page

60

“Steam Road Vehicles,” by G. St. C. B. Davidson, Ph.D., M.Sc., F.R.S.A. 60 pp. 6 in. by 9 3/5in. (H.M.S.O., 3s. 6d.)

This illustrated book, prepared for the Ministry of Education, gives a clear, concise history of the steam road vehicle, from 1687 onwards. It includes details of licensing Acts of interest to veteran-car enthusiasts and there is a useful section, comprising the last three chapters, in which the work of various constructors from 1820 onwards, such as Gurney, Hancock, Knight of Farnham, Amédée Bollée, de Dion, Bouton, Trépardoux, Serpollet, Thornycroft, the Stanley brothers, the White brothers, Doble, etc., is detailed under these separate headings.

The appropriate motor races, etc., are referred to, but we should have liked more on steam traction engines, wagons and buses, which are dismissed in 1 1/2 pages. — W. B.

“Attention All Drivers!” by Jock Taylor. 95 pp., 5 1/2 in. by 8 1/2 in. (The Order of the Road, 55, Park Lane, W.1; 3s. 6d.)

This book is by the well-known ex-Chief Superintendent and Senior Instructor at the Metropolitan Police Motor Driving School at Hendon.

Clubmen know just how well the Hendon Police drivers are trained by having competed against them in various competitive events and they will find in this interesting book, which is clearly illustrated, a description of those methods applied to car control and “roadmanship” which assisted in reducing police-fleet accidents from one per 35,000 miles in 1939 to one per 71,300 miles on the more congested roads of 1952.

Daily inspection of vehicles is covered and a “cockpit drill” worked out for modern cars. This is something different from just another book on how to drive and should be studied with benefit even by proficient drivers. — W. B.