The Ford controversy.

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64

Sir,
The misfortune which has fallen on B.Campbell Kemp since he purchased his Consul must be exceptional and one assumes that he has got one of those ears which occasionally emerge from every factory and with which everything appears to be faulty.

I have suffered similarly with a car considered by many enthusiasts as the ultimate when British cars of the Gran Turisrno style are considered. Engine, transmission, suspension, brakes and body all gave continual trouble and besides the inconvenience caused through the car being off the road for a total of six months in the sixteen months of my ownership, the rectification of the many faults cost considerably more than the new price, including tax, of Mr. K.emp’s Consul. The area distributors had no mechanic with a knowledge of the cars nor did they carry a single spare part—the owner had to carry his own stock—and how necessary that stock proved to be when one endeavoured to obtain parts or information from the factory service department

Nevertheless, there are undoubtedly some people who have had satisfaction from these so called ” race-bred luxury cars,” but I imagine that they will be as difficult to trace as will be dissatisfied Ford owners.

Like Mr. Kemp, I do not intend to tempt providence by purchasing another model from the same factory and now await delivery of a new and much less costly coupe from Coventry with which I anticipate increased performance coupled with reliability and, if required, a prompt and efficient spares service. I am, Yours, etc.,

Edinburgh, 4. Thos. H. Legget.

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