"Take a clean sheet of paper..."

Browse pages
Current page

1

Current page

2

Current page

3

Current page

4

Current page

5

Current page

6

Current page

7

Current page

8

Current page

9

Current page

10

Current page

11

Current page

12

Current page

13

Current page

14

Current page

15

Current page

16

Current page

17

Current page

18

Current page

19

Current page

20

Current page

21

Current page

22

Current page

23

Current page

24

Current page

25

Current page

26

Current page

27

Current page

28

Current page

29

Current page

30

Current page

31

Current page

32

Current page

33

Current page

34

Current page

35

Current page

36

Current page

37

Current page

38

Current page

39

Current page

40

Current page

41

Current page

42

Current page

43

Current page

44

Current page

45

Current page

46

Current page

47

Current page

48

Current page

49

Current page

50

Current page

51

Current page

52

Current page

53

Current page

54

Current page

55

Current page

56

Current page

57

Current page

58

Current page

59

Current page

60

Current page

61

Current page

62

Current page

63

Current page

64

Sir,
Surely it should not be necessary to take a completely clean sheet of paper to give us the sports car indicated by recent correspondence !

The development work would, in the main, appear to have already been carried out in our own Formula III class. The ideal would be, in my view, not to design a 750-c.c. 25-b.h.p. unit as advocated by Mr. Barker, but to utilise a motor already in existence, such as the Triumph T110 600-c.c. twin, which gives, with reliability, 42-b.h.p. and, in my experience, over 70-m.p.g. in a motor-cycle frame.

Combine this with the braking, cornering and roadholding ability advertised in such measure at every Formula III event, and one should have at a comparatively reasonable cost a vehicle able to hold its own with most, and certainly more fun than the majority.

Possibly with plastic body and careful attention to airflow, and with a functional emphasis, such a model ought to be capable of at least 85 plus m.p.h. and a fuel consumption figure between 40 and 50 m.p.g.

It should fill the gap caused by the loss of the sporting Morgan three-wheelers of venerated memory and lie within the same price range, and would provide us with a class of vehicle appropriate to modern economy, and be a fitting development from our own racing class.

It just seems odd that it has not yet been done.

Another matter ! The inclination of the engine in the new Cooper Mk. IX has, I read, been the subject of a patent. Does this imply that the Daimler-Benz Grand Prix cars will have to tilt them back again before they can race in this country.

I am, Yours. etc.,

Coventry. L.G.May.

(We think the answer to the last paragraph of Mr. May’s letter is that it depends which way you tilt it !—Ed.)

Related articles

Related products