New Fords

Browse pages
Current page

1

Current page

2

Current page

3

Current page

4

Current page

5

Current page

6

Current page

7

Current page

8

Current page

9

Current page

10

Current page

11

Current page

12

Current page

13

Current page

14

Current page

15

Current page

16

Current page

17

Current page

18

Current page

19

Current page

20

Current page

21

Current page

22

Current page

23

Current page

24

Current page

25

Current page

26

Current page

27

Current page

28

Current page

29

Current page

30

Current page

31

Current page

32

Current page

33

Current page

34

Current page

35

Current page

36

Current page

37

Current page

38

Current page

39

Current page

40

Current page

41

Current page

42

Current page

43

Current page

44

Current page

45

Current page

46

Current page

47

Current page

48

Current page

49

Current page

50

Current page

51

Current page

52

Current page

53

Current page

54

Current page

55

Current page

56

Current page

57

Current page

58

Current page

59

Current page

60

Current page

61

Current page

62

Current page

63

Current page

64

Current page

65

Current page

66

Current page

67

Current page

68

Current page

69

Current page

70

Current page

71

Current page

72

Current page

73

Current page

74

In 1927, when 15 million model-Ts had been produced and Henry Ford had finally decided to bring out a replacement, mention of new Fords sent the news-hawks scudding and motoring journalists acted like Fleet Street reporters, grasping any and every clue, using every opportunity and much strategy to discover the smallest scrap of information about the new car. Eventually the story broke on December 2nd, 1927, amidst scenes of wild enthusiasm and intense interest.

It was very different last month, when we drove to Regent Street, London, at the invitation of the Ford Motor Company of Dagenham, to see the new Fords of 1959. Any hope of revolutionary new cars such as the rumoured four-speed high-revving 1,000-c.c. family car, or the disc brakes of the rally cars as an optional extra, or even that a four-speed gearbox had been introduced for the Consul, Zephyr and Zodiac, or up-to-date overhead-valve engines for the existing small Fords, was quickly dispelled when the assembled journalists were told that the mechanical specification of these well-established cars continues without  change.

What  Ford has done to justify calling these “Three Graces”  New-Look Mark ll’s is to introduce revised furnishing, instrumentation, a lower roof line and new body embellishments.

The changes common to all three cars embrace the lower roof line, a new drip rail embellishment, stainless screen and rear window cappings, chrome headlamp bezels, and, in the interiors, a restyled facia, twist-release hand-brake, new steering-column shroud, soft-padded sun vizors, a new rear-view mirror, restyled seats with new upholstery, safety front-door locks, restyled door trim and thief-proof locks for the quarter-light catches. The new upholstery in one form is a Ford exclusive, known as Cougar Crain P.V.C., which is P.V.C. in its own texture, instead of developed to imitate cow-hide.

In addition, the de luxe models have other innovations, such as restyled side-panels, tail-lamps. and new wheel discs, grille badge, a back-panel chrome embellishment and restyled rear reflectors. Arm-rests, half-horn-ring, map pocket, etc., are also provided on certain cars. 

Four million vehicles have been produced at Dagenham in 28 years and since the “Three Graces” were introduced three years ago, 340,000 Consuls, Zephyrs, and Zodiacs have been sold. The minor improvements now introduced do not increase the price of these cars, and Ford are ennlident that they will enjoy a successful future. —  W.B.