1960 Argentine Grand Prix race report: McLaren continues winning ways

Cooper's Bruce McLaren claims his second victory at season opener as Brabham, Moss and Bonnier fall by the wayside; Moss takes over Trintignant's car to finish third

Author

admin

Browse pages
Current page

1

Current page

2

Current page

3

Current page

4

Current page

5

Current page

6

Current page

7

Current page

8

Current page

9

Current page

10

Current page

11

Current page

12

Current page

13

Current page

14

Current page

15

Current page

16

Current page

17

Current page

18

Current page

19

Current page

20

Current page

21

Current page

22

Current page

23

Current page

24

Current page

25

Current page

26

Current page

27

Current page

28

Current page

29

Current page

30

Current page

31

Current page

32

Current page

33

Current page

34

Current page

35

Current page

36

Current page

37

Current page

38

Current page

39

Current page

40

Current page

41

Current page

42

Current page

43

Current page

44

Current page

45

Current page

46

Current page

47

Current page

48

Current page

49

Current page

50

Current page

51

Current page

52

Current page

53

Current page

54

Current page

55

Current page

56

Current page

57

Current page

58

Current page

59

Current page

60

Current page

61

Current page

62

Current page

63

Current page

64

Current page

65

Current page

66

Current page

67

Current page

68

Current page

69

Current page

70

Current page

71

Current page

72

Current page

73

Current page

74

Current page

75

Current page

76

Current page

77

Current page

78

Current page

79

Current page

80

Current page

81

Current page

82

Current page

83

Current page

84

In 1959 the series of Argentinian races that normally open the racing season were missed, but 1960 saw them back on the Calendar and run according to previous form. The three week racing season contained a round of the Drivers’ World Champion, namely the Argentine Grand Prix, a round of the Sports Car Championship in the 1,000 kilometre race, and a Formule Libre race.

The 1,000 kilometres of Buenos Aires (January 31st)

Held on a 9.5kms circuit comprising part of the Autodromo and a stretch of dual-carriageway, this race was expected to be a straight fight between Ferrari and Porsche, these being the only works teams entered. Phil Hill/Allison and von Trips/Ginther had 12-cylinder 3-litre Ferraris, while Gonzalez/Scarfiotti had a Dino-engined car of 2.4-litres. Porsche entered three 1,600cc RSK models with drivers Bonnier Graham Hill, Trintignant/Herrmann and Barth/Gendebien, while von Hanstein/Bohnen had a works Carrera GT. The rest of the entry of 28 cars was made up from a mixed collection of private owners or small Scuderias, but surprise of the race came from the Camoradi Team entry of Gurney/Gregory with a new 2.8-litre “birdcage chassis” Tipo 61 Maserati. Gurney set the pace and led all the factory cars for a considerable time, including making fastest lap, and this new Maserati was undoubtedly faster than the Ferraris. It eventually succumbed to gearbox and shock-absorber troubles, and had to withdraw, leaving the two 3-litre Ferraris in full command of the race, with the ever-waiting Porsches in the next places.

Once the Maserati had dropped out the race became a procession and the 23 starters dwindled to 11 by the end of the 1,000 kilometres.

The Argentine Grand Prix (February 7th)

As is usual the F1 race was held in the Autodromo at Buenos Aires on the No 2 circuit of 3.9 kilometres for a distance of 80 laps. Works entries came from Ferrari, Cooper, BRM and Lotus, with two Equipe-Walker cars as well. Graham Hill was having his first drive for BRM and started well by leading at the start and duelling with Bonnier (BRM) and Moss (Cooper-Walker). Once again the Walker car fell apart, this time in the rear suspension, and Bonnier held a good lead but later had to call at the pits with overheating, while Graham Hill succumbed to the high air temperatures, as did Stacey with one of the works Lotus cars.

Brabham retired and as at Sebring his staunch team-mate, young McLaren, upheld Cooper fortunes to pass Allison’s Ferrari and Ireland’s works Lotus, to take the lead when Bonnier stopped. Having broken his own car Moss took over the other Walker entry from Trintignant and for a time motor racing relived in the past, when racing was racing, for Moss did his utmost to regain the lead for the Walker team, getting to third place just 10sec behind Allison’s Ferrari before the finish. Both BRMs were 1959 front-engined cars.

Although this effort on behalf of the team netted them third place Moss gained no points in the Championship rating, but instead had the satisfaction of having driven a good race, which is surely much more important. One hopes that having set a precedent in doing this, other teams and drivers will follow his example and help us to get back to some proper motor-racing, where each event is a race in itself, and not overshadow the object of each race with the absurd “points chasing” that has bogged down Grand Prix racing these last two years.