No substitute for torque

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Sir,
The recent correspondence in this magazine has highlighted the true quality and performance of American V8 engines.

We in Britain have tended to dismiss these designs as technically dull and un-advanced, but this myth has been exploded by revered home manufacturers who have taken to installing 4- or 5-litre U.S. engines in their chassis. These inspired “marriages” have produced sensational results, proving beyond all doubt the worth of American engine design. The latest testimonial is Eric Broadley’s outstanding new Lola, powered by a V8 Ford engine and potentially the fastest G.T. car in the world. Even the most stoic European enthusiasts cannot disregard the evidence supporting U.S. engines, and any charges of “sacrilege” levelled against these enterprising British manufacturers are groundless and unjust.

Such engines are more than equal in conception and performance to the European counterparts. Their terrific low-speed torque is truly exhilarating, providing effortless acceleration which is maintained throughout the extensive rev. range. The twin o.h.c. Jaguar engine has a limit of 6,000 r.p.m. but the Ford V8 in the A.C. Cobra will rev. to 7,200 r.p.m.! and remember that this is a push-rod engine! Does this look like clumsy engineering and inferior design?

The greatest threat to British competition success in the future comes not from Maranello, but from Detroit! and anyone who still views the U.S. Industry with smug complacency is in for a shock.

I can assure Mr. Johnson that he is not the only one who has made sheeps’ eyes at Daimler’s dormant four and a half.

Michael J. Parkinson.
Northampton.