Matters of Moment, March 1964

Browse pages
Current page

1

Current page

2

Current page

3

Current page

4

Current page

5

Current page

6

Current page

7

Current page

8

Current page

9

Current page

10

Current page

11

Current page

12

Current page

13

Current page

14

Current page

15

Current page

16

Current page

17

Current page

18

Current page

19

Current page

20

Current page

21

Current page

22

Current page

23

Current page

24

Current page

25

Current page

26

Current page

27

Current page

28

Current page

29

Current page

30

Current page

31

Current page

32

Current page

33

Current page

34

Current page

35

Current page

36

Current page

37

Current page

38

Current page

39

Current page

40

Current page

41

Current page

42

Current page

43

Current page

44

Current page

45

Current page

46

Current page

47

Current page

48

Current page

49

Current page

50

Current page

51

Current page

52

Current page

53

Current page

54

Current page

55

Current page

56

Current page

57

Current page

58

Current page

59

Current page

60

Current page

61

Current page

62

Current page

63

Current page

64

Current page

65

Current page

66

Current page

67

Current page

68

Current page

69

Current page

70

Current page

71

Current page

72

Current page

73

Current page

74

Current page

75

Current page

76

Current page

77

Current page

78

Current page

79

Current page

80

Current page

81

Current page

82

Current page

83

CONGRATULATIONS …

. . . . to Paddy Hopkirk and Henry Liddon on their splendid outright victory in the Monte Carlo Rally, endorsing all MOTOR SPORT has said in the past about the merits of the front-drive, rubber-sprung small cars built by the British Motor Corporation. That the little Mini-Cooper S beat even the mighty Ford Falcon Sprints, on which American Ford had staked so much, was sweet indeed for Britain’s Motor Industry. Even Mr. Marples has ordered one of these Minis. which we hope will prove at least the equal of his bicycle …. Last year, when Ford introduced their powerful GT engine and enticed away from the B.M.C. some of their best rally drivers, Alec Issigonis spoke of a new Mini-Cooper and remained quietly confident. His unconcern was justified and the Monte Carlo victory of the Mini-Cooper S should be reflected in an increased demand for all models of the successful Mini family.

Coupled with warm congratulations to modest Hopkirk go congratulations to all concerned, not forgetting Wilson McComb, B.M.C. Competitions Press Officer, who contrived a very topical interview with the victorious driver on the eve of the rally.

CONGRATULATIONS …

. . . . to Mike Hailwood, on keeping his licence when his ease of driving in a built-up area at 75 m.p.h. was heard recently. John Gordon of the Sunday Express criticised the Court’s decision as absurd, illogical and unjust, because the Chairman of the Sessions did not disqualify Hailwood and thus jeopardise his three Motorcycle World Championships. At other times the Sunday Express is pleased to make much of National heroes and brave men. Does it not occur to John Gordon that the Magistrates may have appreciated that to someone of Hailwood’s ability and judgement and keen eyesight 75-m.p.h. is not quite so shocking as it sounds? In any case, £75 is a pretty stiff fine, and the winning of a triple crown of no little value to British prestige deserves a little leniency in a case in which no accident happened and no-one else was involved.

MUCH ENTHUSIASM

That 100,253 people attended the January Racing Car Show in London, compared to the 560,001 who went to Earls Court last October, is a firm indication of the interest taken in high-performance motoring in all its forms. This B.R.S.C.C. exhibition was the fifth of the series and it has been widely assumed that the first Racing Car Show was held, therefore, in 1960. So far as a commercial show is concerned, this may be so but – credit where credit is due – the first racing car display, as such, was probably that organised by the present Editor of MOTOR SPORT, under the sponsorship of Capt. O. V. Holmes, proprietor of Brooklands  – Track & Air, in the Paddock at Brooklands, during the B.A.R.C. Easter Meeting of 1934. The cars displayed comprised Chitty Bang Bang I, loaned by the Conan Doyle brothers, the Blake brothers’ 1903 G.B. Napier, R. G. J. Nash’s 1912 G.P. Lorraine-Dietrich “Vieux Charles Trois,” and R. O. Shuttleworth’s replica Paris-Madrid 1903 de Dietrich. Today Chitty I has been broken up, the Napier is in America, the Lorraine-Dietrich in the Montagu Motor Museum and the de Dietrich in the Shuttleworth Trust Collection.

And in 1948 the B.R.D.C. organised a Racing Car Exhibition at Henly Hall for the Primrose League, at which many racing cars, now recognised as historic, were displayed.

MEMO FOR A MINISTER!

The Conservative Party is hopeful of remaining in power after the forthcoming General Election – and the best of British luck (sincerely).

To gain motorists’ votes there are several things that Ernest Marples might consider, such as raising the town speed-limit to 40 m.p.h. (even if doubling the penalties for exceeding it), recruiting a force of motor special police from amongst the more reliable Motor Club members, sworn in and controlled in the same way as existing Special Constables, to aid the regular police in keeping the traffic flowing in emergencies and apprehending dangerous and careless drivers, and making Traffic Wardens undergo a course of Common Politeness.

Best of all, Marples might offer careful drivers a concession, applying at the time of renewing their clean three year driving licences, of six years, or 4 1/2 years, before three endorsements entailed automatic disqualification, instead of retaining the three-year clause in this respect for everyone, no matter how good or how black their former driving record.