Screen washers

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Sir,
I was interested to read the letter you published, from Mr. A.F. Poynton, concerning the windscreen washer on his 1935 Triumph Gloria, particularly as I also owned a 1935 Gloria, but without the washer device, referred to.

However, some four year’s ago I unearthed a rather unusual Standard Ten, with a genuine mileage of 42,000, which had been stored by its owner from 1943 until his death, when I purchased it for £5 in an auction (no inflated values then). The car was a 1934 Standard Ten similar to the then current 10 h.p. 4-door saloon, and was, I believe, called the Standard Ten Sports Saloon. The car differed from the basic saloon in the extra equipment, viz :—

1, sun-roof; 2; knock-on wire wheels; 3, finned brake-drums; 4, twin Solex carbs.; 5, rev, counter and 6, windscreen washers (exactly similar to those on Mr. Poynton’s Gloria, but one year earlier.

I spent long hours getting the car in working order, only to have the block and head irreparably damaged, after a particularly severe frost (couldn’t afford the anti-freeze). Thoroughly disheartened. I gave the car away. The new owner promptly fitted a replacement engine from the Standard factory, and used the car for 800 trouble-free miles on his honeymoon ! Despite the fact that the car was using four Dunlop tyres and tubes fitted by the original owner, the only complaint was that the old car only returned 15 m.p.g.

Having since moved to Northern Ireland I have lost touch with the owner and had almost forgotten about the car, until the “earliest fitted washer” claim in the December Motor Sport.

I now run a 1963 Cortina GT (T.i ?) which has given thoroughly reliable service, and which I find ideally suited to the excellent traffic-free roads over here, particularly as most Irishmen refuse to believe that the futile-70 m.p.h. speed limit, really-applies here.

Usual disclaimers. Co. Antrim. P. Warren-Tibbetts.