The ex-Prince Chula's Rolls-Royce

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Sir,
Your question “has it survived?” about Prince Chula’s Rolls-Royce 20-25 in “Cars in Books”, led me to dig out this picture taken for R-R-EC records. [See below.—Ed.]

It was taken at last April’s VSCC Silverstone meeting, which accounts for the typical salubrious background. The car was parked just opposite the vintage car parking area.

The car is still in the original two-tone blue colour scheme, and is interesting in that not only is the body low and very closely coupled, but also has a division. As a result there is no possible seat adjustment, which accounts for the difficulty for tall drivers.

The present owner, Mr. R. T. Gausden, of Sutton Coldfield, may have written to you, as he has a full knowledge of the car’s history. For the collectors of detail, the chassis number is GTZ 3 and engine number L2D.

Colin W. Hughes.
Uxbridge, Middlesex.