Desert runabouts

Browse pages
Current page

1

Current page

2

Current page

3

Current page

4

Current page

5

Current page

6

Current page

7

Current page

8

Current page

9

Current page

10

Current page

11

Current page

12

Current page

13

Current page

14

Current page

15

Current page

16

Current page

17

Current page

18

Current page

19

Current page

20

Current page

21

Current page

22

Current page

23

Current page

24

Current page

25

Current page

26

Current page

27

Current page

28

Current page

29

Current page

30

Current page

31

Current page

32

Current page

33

Current page

34

Current page

35

Current page

36

Current page

37

Current page

38

Current page

39

Current page

40

Current page

41

Current page

42

Current page

43

Current page

44

Current page

45

Current page

46

Current page

47

Current page

48

Current page

49

Current page

50

Current page

51

Current page

52

Current page

53

Current page

54

Current page

55

Current page

56

Current page

57

Current page

58

Current page

59

Current page

60

Current page

61

Current page

62

Current page

63

Current page

64

Current page

65

Current page

66

Current page

67

Current page

68

Current page

69

Current page

70

Current page

71

Current page

72

Current page

73

Current page

74

Current page

75

Current page

76

Current page

77

Current page

78

Current page

79

Current page

80

Current page

81

Current page

82

Current page

83

Current page

84

Current page

85

Current page

86

Current page

87

Current page

88

Current page

89

Current page

90

Current page

91

Current page

92

Current page

93

Current page

94

Current page

95

Current page

96

Current page

97

Current page

98

Current page

99

Current page

100

Current page

101

Current page

102

Current page

103

Current page

104

Current page

105

Current page

106

Current page

107

Current page

108

Current page

109

Current page

110

Current page

111

Current page

112

Current page

113

Current page

114

Current page

115

Current page

116

Current page

117

Current page

118

Current page

119

Current page

120

Current page

121

Current page

122

Current page

123

Current page

124

Current page

125

Current page

126

Current page

127

Current page

128

Current page

129

Current page

130

Current page

131

Current page

132

Sir,
The letter in the November issue by John R. Millburn was very interesting to me a 74-year-old. At first glance of the picture of the old Model-T Ford I thought it was one of ours which we had with the 7th Light Armoured Car Battery (7th LAMB) in Mesopotamia in 1917. We went to German East Africa in 1917 with four Rolls-Royce Armoured Cars, thirteen Model-T Ford trucks and some Triumph motorcycles. The Fords were left-hand drive and one collided with a tram in Exeter on the journey from Bulford to Devonport. A rear wheel collapsed in German East Africa owing to the shrinkage of the wooden spokes, after which incident we wrapped strips of blankets around the spokes near the hubs and kept these moist as and when we could spare the water. When the German troops went over the Portuguese East African border we were sent to Mesopotamia. Our four Rolls-Royce armoured cars were taken from us and given to another battery to make eight car batteries and we were given nine double-turret armoured Austins. We still retained the Model-T Ford trucks and left them in Mesopotamia in 1919. During the rainy season we fitted Parsons skid chains to the rear wheels in order to get a better grip and in loose sand we often had to be pushed by colleagues when the rear wheels churned their way into the sand. The ASC (Army Service Corps) had many Model-Ts in the Baghdad area.

Thank you Mr. Milburn for your interesting letter and the editor of Motor Sport for publishing it.

C. A. Booty.
Stapleford.

***

Sir,
I was interested in reading about the Army Desert Runabouts in the November and December issues, as my brother purchased about two years ago a Dodge Pickup or Runabout. It was an Army vehicle originally and subsequent removal of paint proved the correctness of this fact, told verbally to us. Its registration number is of the year approximately 1922. The makers say from its dimensions it was made round about 1916 so it was in army hands for a period of five to six years.

It was on an island on Loch Lomond and was in regular use up until about sixteen years ago, being utilised for the carriage of goods from the pier to the dwelling house.

On inspection we found the plug leads perished to nothing but fortunately the engine was free, thanks to holiday-makers etc. cranking the fixed starting handle from time to time. New plugs, new leads and the carburetter filled with petrol; three cranks at the handle and we had a runner!

Complete renovation is now well under way and should he completed by this time next year. It has wooden spoke wheels all round with peculiar rear rims presumably fitted for extra grip on soft ground.

We hope that the fact of at least one ex-army Runabout? still surviving, will please some other enthusiasts.

Bob Kerr.
Luss.