Wrong Routes

Browse pages
Current page

1

Current page

2

Current page

3

Current page

4

Current page

5

Current page

6

Current page

7

Current page

8

Current page

9

Current page

10

Current page

11

Current page

12

Current page

13

Current page

14

Current page

15

Current page

16

Current page

17

Current page

18

Current page

19

Current page

20

Current page

21

Current page

22

Current page

23

Current page

24

Current page

25

Current page

26

Current page

27

Current page

28

Current page

29

Current page

30

Current page

31

Current page

32

Current page

33

Current page

34

Current page

35

Current page

36

Current page

37

Current page

38

Current page

39

Current page

40

Current page

41

Current page

42

Current page

43

Current page

44

Current page

45

Current page

46

Current page

47

Current page

48

Current page

49

Current page

50

Current page

51

Current page

52

Current page

53

Current page

54

Current page

55

Current page

56

Current page

57

Current page

58

Current page

59

Current page

60

Current page

61

Current page

62

Current page

63

Current page

64

Current page

65

Current page

66

Current page

67

Current page

68

Current page

69

Current page

70

Current page

71

Current page

72

Current page

73

Current page

74

Current page

75

Current page

76

Current page

77

Current page

78

Current page

79

Current page

80

Current page

81

Current page

82

Current page

83

Current page

84

Current page

85

Current page

86

Current page

87

Current page

88

Current page

89

Current page

90

Current page

91

Current page

92

Current page

93

Current page

94

Current page

95

Current page

96

Current page

97

Current page

98

Current page

99

Current page

100

Current page

101

Current page

102

Current page

103

Current page

104

Current page

105

Current page

106

Current page

107

Current page

108

Reading in the February issue of Aeroplane Monthly of the sad accident which occurred at the 1952 SBAC Farnborough (RAE) Air Display, in which John Derry’s DH 110 disintegrated over the crowd, killing the famous test pilot, his observer and 28 members of the public, reminds me of two happier Farnborough happenings. One Sunday evening, having a motor-racing assignment at the News Chronicle, I was on my way from Fleet to London and, hoping to avoid the congestion on this public display viewing day, I used a narrow lane across the common to gain the A325.

What I didn’t know was that this main road had been turned temporarily into a four-lane one-way exit from the RAE in the Farnham direction, by putting up “No Left Turn” notices at all adjoining roads where normally a right turn was permissable. Except that this little-used lane had been overlooked by those erecting the notices!

So in my innocent A7 I made a left turn, after which all hell broke loose. Confronted by cars four abreast bearing down on me I blew the horn and stopped. A policeman rushed up, demanding to know what the hell I thought I was doing? “Trying to get to London”, I replied. “It’s a one-way road; you’re in big trouble” the constable responded, as an Inspector hurried to join him. He repeated this information, almost yelling “You disobeyed the notices”. “There isn’t one at the lane I used” I told him. The gloating young bobby was sent unbelievingly, to check. He came back crestfallen. I was vindicated and the volume of exiting traffic from the RAE had to be halted, to enable WB and one little A7 saloon to proceed…

On another occasion I was driving with a young daughter in the Morgan Plus-4, but this time, at the same place, traffic was pouring into the RAE, for the afternoon flying. I was waved into the left hand lane, although protesting that I had seen the Display on Press-day and now I just wanted to get home. No go! Perhaps a label (motor racing) on the windscreen had convinced the police that I was Display-bound. So in we had to go. Arriving at the pay-box/ticketcheck I explained the situation. “Just drive on to that RAF Officer” I was instructed. He was 100% politeness and understanding and showed me how to escape; or, he said, you can stay and see the Show again, free — except unfortunately, young children are not allowed on Trade days. Full marks for sensible organisation, presumably intended to appease those with no tickets or the wrong ones…

A notice had been put up at Frimley Bridge, on the Londoners’ route to the Display, reading “SPEED IN THE AIR, CARE ON THE ROADS”, but it was a fast aeroplane that killed those unsuspecting spectators. On a happier note again, Motor Sport’s photographer once went to the Display on a very wet day, but got good pictures. On his return he said “What puzzled me was that the only aeroplanes unable to take off were the All-Weather Lightnings!”

You may also like

Related products