We're all goin' on a winter holiday

Browse pages
Current page

1

Current page

2

Current page

3

Current page

4

Current page

5

Current page

6

Current page

7

Current page

8

Current page

9

Current page

10

Current page

11

Current page

12

Current page

13

Current page

14

Current page

15

Current page

16

Current page

17

Current page

18

Current page

19

Current page

20

Current page

21

Current page

22

Current page

23

Current page

24

Current page

25

Current page

26

Current page

27

Current page

28

Current page

29

Current page

30

Current page

31

Current page

32

Current page

33

Current page

34

Current page

35

Current page

36

Current page

37

Current page

38

Current page

39

Current page

40

Current page

41

Current page

42

Current page

43

Current page

44

Current page

45

Current page

46

Current page

47

Current page

48

Current page

49

Current page

50

Current page

51

Current page

52

Current page

53

Current page

54

Current page

55

Current page

56

Current page

57

Current page

58

Current page

59

Current page

60

Current page

61

Current page

62

Current page

63

Current page

64

Current page

65

Current page

66

Current page

67

Current page

68

Current page

69

Current page

70

Current page

71

Current page

72

Current page

73

Current page

74

Current page

75

Current page

76

Current page

77

Current page

78

Current page

79

Current page

80

Current page

81

Current page

82

Current page

83

Current page

84

Current page

85

Current page

86

Current page

87

Current page

88

Current page

89

Current page

90

Current page

91

Current page

92

Current page

93

Current page

94

Current page

95

Current page

96

Current page

97

Current page

98

Current page

99

Current page

100

Current page

101

Current page

102

Current page

103

Current page

104

Current page

105

Current page

106

Current page

107

Current page

108

Current page

109

Current page

110

Current page

111

Current page

112

Current page

113

Current page

114

Current page

115

Current page

116

Current page

117

Current page

118

Current page

119

Current page

120

Current page

121

Current page

122

Current page

123

Current page

124

Current page

125

Current page

126

Current page

127

Current page

128

Current page

129

Current page

130

Current page

131

Current page

132

Current page

133

Current page

134

Current page

135

Current page

136

Current page

137

Current page

138

Current page

139

Current page

140

Current page

141

Current page

142

Current page

143

Current page

144

Current page

145

Current page

146

Current page

147

Current page

148

The National Motor Museum’s workshop has been busy. The blower Bentley has been given a reconditioned radiator and its two magnetos have been overhauled, while even more work was required on the 1922 14-seater Maxwell charabanc before it went on last year’s HCVC Brighton Run. It needed new master front spring leaves and shackle pins, and attention to clutch and starter, after which it had a trouble-free run.

I recall going on the 1964 Brighton Run in this Maxwell (above), driven by Lord Montagu. It took 3hr 10min. We were accompanied by scantily clad showgirls from the Black & White Minstrels troupe. They had assumed that all motor coaches had heaters. They were thus terribly cold, and more so when ushered out at the halfway stop for a photocall. But as a 1931 Gilford coach, which had been provided to convey wives and friends of the party back to London after the run, slowly overtook the Maxwell up a gradient on the road to the seaside, it was difficult to warm up the dancers with our wives waving to us as the Iwo coaches passed!

I’d had a comfortably warm Brighton ride a year earlier when I was invited to go in the cab of T T Brighton & Sons’ 1928 Foden steam-waggon, with its driver W Hearn, but a much colder one in 1970 when I was allowed to ride on a pile of coal in the back of a 1916 Foden five-tonner named ‘The Dorset Rambler’, driven by Mr. Hardwicke, his son stoking. That trip took just over six hours.