Murray Walker & James Hunt at the 1986 German GP: Flashback

For two decades Maurice Hamilton reported from the F1 paddock with pen, notebook and Canon Sure Shot camera. He captured the BBC TV commentary team of Murray Walker and James Hunt at the 1986 German GP

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There were few commentary positions better than this one at Hockenheim. Having gained access to the lofty perch thanks to keeping a lap chart for BBC Radio, I had the opportunity to catch the BBC TV team preparing for the 1986 German Grand Prix.

James Hunt takes in the panoramic view of the stadium while Murray Walker refers to his copious notes and sets the scene. Murray may have always had a preference for a lip mike, but it was essential here.

As can be seen, the mezzanine floor for broadcasters was slung beneath the roof of the massive grandstand. Commentators found themselves at the top of a cacophonous echo chamber filled with the roar of the crowd beneath and cars blasting past the pits. It brought new meaning to the term ‘atmospheric’, particularly when spectators could react to either the sight of a new leader emerging into the stadium or as often happened, a piece of demon out-braking into the Sachs Kurve that followed. When Michael Schumacher appeared six years later, school was out. On every lap, it seemed.