A Claim Substantiated By Facts-

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A Claim Substantiated By Facts A general-purpose Car built for the enthusiast, who, although primarily requiring a Car

for business and really fast averages, wishes to compete in Speed Events, Reliability Trials and Hill Climbs. The Frazer Nash is pre-eminently THE car for the owner-driver.” (Taken from a Frazer Nash advertisement in the January 1931 issue of “Motor Sport.”)

—furthermore, a claim proven in 1931 and 1932 by a long list of convincing successes, and equally true in 1933. Proved leader of the 1,500 class, and the finest all-round ” standard production sports car—Proof? Shelsley Walsh, Copsail Park, Brighton, Lewes—a repetition of first, second and third in the 1,500 class. Best performance, John o’ Groats to Monte Carlo, in the recent Rally up to 1,500 c.c. Fastest non-supercharged time of the day in the Mont des Mules hill climb, and a new record for the 1,500 class. Holder of Graigantlet, Lewes, Brooklands Test Hill records, and British Champion

of Shelsley Walsh—to mention only a few achievements. However hard a car is driven on the road, it will never come up to the severe gruelling to which a car is subjected in competition and racing—particularly the latter.

The two actual examples herewith are adduced as proof of the all-round efficiency of the Frazer Nash in widely contrasted spheres of motoring sport—events in which a car to achieve success must be absolutely reliable, fast and possess outstanding acceleration, 100 per cent, braking efficiency and superb roadholding qualities.

Example I.

FRAZER NASH M.V. 3079 (privately owned by R. Brooke, Esq., of Grazeley Court, near Reading). INTERNATIONAL ALPINE TRIAL, July 28 to August 3, 1932.

Recognised as the world’s most severe reliability trial—over 1,500 miles in length including the Dolomites, Austrian and Eastern Alps, and a further 1,700 miles approximately of Continental roads out to Munich and home from San Remo. Competing in this event for the first time the non-supercharged Frazer Nash gained a Coupe des Glaciers—the highest possible award—finishing without the loss of a single mark. Incidentally, the other Frazer Nash entered also gained a Coupe des Glaciers, and put up the fastest time of the day on the Stelvio up to, and including, the 2,000 c.c. class. Frazer Nash was the only make of car in the 1,100-1,500 class to score a 100 per cent. success, and the only 4-cyl. 1,500 c.c. cars to gain an award.

TOURIST TROPHY RACE, Ards Circuit, Belfast. August 20, 1932.

This success in the Alpine Trial was a fine achievement, but to further demonstrate the stamina of a standard Frazer Nash, M.V. 3079 competed in the Tourist Trophy, being one of only 10 cars to finish out of 32 starters, having an absolutely trouble-free run, only stopping once to take on petrol. Although driven well within its capabilities its average speed of 68.68 m.p.h. (fastest lap 70.76 m.p.h.) was nevertheless higher for the non-supercharged 1,500 class than in any previous race of the series, and the Frazer Nash was the fastest 4-cyl. 1,500 c.c. car on the course. “Motor Sport” (September, 1932) said, “The Frazer Nash was the most ‘ touring ‘ car in the Tourist Trophy Race !

M.C.C. HIGH SPEED TRIAL, Brooklands, September 3, 1932. Frazer Nash M.V. 3079 was out once again in this annual M.C.C. event, open only to standard production sports cars—the entry included every well-known make of sports car. The Frazer Nash was the first car to finish, covering 31 laps in the hour from a standing start— averaging 85.43 m.p.h., two up and fully equipped for the road—the highest speed of the day. Incidentally, among other successes the ,

same day, in the Morning High Speed Trial the only cars to gain Premier Awards were 3 Frazer Nashes. “Motor Sport”, in reporting this meeting, said, ” Frazer Nashes carry all before them.”

Example II.

FRAZER NASH M.V. 3742 (a standard production model—non-supercharged).

LONDON—GLOUCESTER TRIAL, December 10, 1932.

Frazer Nash M.V. 3742 won the ACCELERATION TEST on Bismore Hill (maximum gradient 1 in 4) putting up fastest time of the day with a bottom gear ratio of 9 to 1 ! There was a total entry of 126 including supercharged cars.

LONDON—EXETER TRIAL, December 31, 1932—January 1, 1933.

Frazer Nash M.V. 3742. GOLD MEDAL. “One must not forget the efforts of the Frazer Nash drivers who followed the example of their leader, H. I. Aldington, and roared round

the corners to the delight of the crowd.” “The Frazer Nashes were travelling far too fast for the camera in the somewhat indifferent light.”

The Motor”, January 3, 1933.

” Gripper’s Frazer Nash was very fast, causing excitement among the spectators.”

“Clayton’s Nash was certainly the fastest machine so far, and Marshall on another Frazer Nash much the same as regards velocity.’

” H. J. Aldington skidded his Frazer Nash beautifully round the second corner and then literally shot up the rest of the hill.”

” The Autocar,” January 6: 1933.

BROOKLANDS, B.A.R.C. MEETING, March 11, 1933.

The First Three-Lap Mountain Handicap.

Frazer Nash M.V. 3742 THIRD. Lap speeds-56.92, 63.44 and 64.21 m.p.h. (official).

The Weybridge Lightning Mountain Handicap. FIRST, at an average speed of 62.31 m.p.h.

Lap speeds-56.16, 63.63, 64.60, 63.63 and 63.82 m.p.h. (official). “The last Mountain race was the most thrilling of all. H. J. Aldington (Frazer Nash) drove magnificently and maintained his lead to the end—but it was not for want of trying on the part of others. Time after time a horde of Bugattis descended on the Fork, sorted them

selves out and got round somehow—most of them, that is ! ” ” The Light Car and Cyclecar,” March 17, 1933. FRAZER NASH CARS FALCON WORKS LONDON ROAD ISLEWORTH MIDDLESEX HOUNSLOW 3171 . 3172