A SPECIAL 41/2-LITRE BENTLEY

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A SPECIAL 41-LITRE BENTLEY

Windrurn and Garstin, Ltd., Hansard Mews, Holland Road, Kensington, have specialised for several years in the oldmodel Bentley cars. A visit to their premises reveals much to gladden the enthusiast’s heart, and makes one long to pen an ode anent the passing of an age when big sports cars were of massive proportions and huskily built and avoirdupois not then frowned upon providing a motor handled like a thoroughbred and possessed adequate performance. This concern has lately evolved a very attractive 41,-litre job, which may be put into limited production. The frame is that of a 3-litre Bentley of 1923 vintage, cut down to give a 9-ft. wheelbase. The engine, radiator, front axle and major components are all 4i-litre, and a most attractive two-seater body is fitted. The chassis has been suitably strengthened and the lessened weight and compact dimensions result in a very healthy performance. The engine is untuned, and actually has a lowered compression-ratio for trials purposes, yet a speed of 92 m.p.h. has been achieved on the road. With tuning modifications in which this concern specialise, which include raised compression, flat-top valves, and hourglass pistons, a speed of 110 m.p.h. would be possible without excessive revving. This short 44-litre has a special, large capacity rear fuel tank, the filler-cap, incidentally, coming from one of the 1924 Le Mans team cars. Feed is by dual S.U. pumps. The handbrake is external, and the short gearlever protrudes through the body side. The bonnet-top extends rearwards over the scuttle so that the business-side of

the instrument panel is disclosed when it is raised, an additional fabric cover held down by press-studs protecting the wiring, etc. An additional pair of Hartfords is used for the rear axle, and the car handles like a really good Bentley. It would be a fine mvtor for the big-car enthusiast who can afford to run a real motor-car Marcus Chambers drove it in the Land’s End Trial, when it gained a ” lironze,” its driver inadvertently switching-off the fuel pumps in the re-start test on CrackIngton, and failing on Bluehills Mine. Incidentally, Mrs. L. Garstin, who takes a keen interest in the concern, will be running a very fine a-litre Bentley in speed events and rallies, etc., this season. Chambers is re-conditioning his 1907, 42 h.p. Rei}ault, using a big, down-draught carburetter from the late Sir Henry Birkin’s Bentley.

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