The New Aston-Martin

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Aston-Martin enthusiasts are so used to associating four cylinders and a single overhead camshaft with this famous marque, that the six cylinders and twin o.h. camshafts of the recently-announced 2½-litre D.B., Mark II model may come as something of a shock to them. But there is no denying that this production version of the saloon prototype which ran at Le Mans last year, going very rapidly until assailed by plumbing trouble, is an interesting car.
 
It employs the Lagonda 2½-litre, 78 by 99-mm., six-cylinder engine in a chassis very similar to that used for the post-war Hill-designed push-rod four-cylinder Aston-Martin, and the two-door aerodynamic coupé body is exceedingly handsome. Front suspension is by coil springs and trailing arms and at the back the independent rear suspension of the Lagonda has given way to a rigid axle, also on coil springs. Real accessibility, we are interested to notice, appears likely to become a feature of modern aerodynamic cars. The Jowett Javelin is so arranged that the entire engine cover-cum-scuttle-cum-front wings hinges back for access to the engine, while in the case of the D.B. Mk. II Aston-Martin the cover hinges forward, and can be removed if desired, to obtain much the same effect. As Motor Sport observed some time ago, the real sports-car is returning to the world’s markets and this new Aston-Martin, which should be capable of speeds around 100 m.p.h., certainly qualifies as such a car. A team will run in the principal sports-car races and their progress will be watched closely by prospective purchasers; sales follow the chequered flag, and forthcoming battles between Aston-Martin, Allard, Jaguar, Jupiter and the rest are likely to be very keenly fought.