REMINISCENCES

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REMINISCENCES

Sir, I was very interested in recent references to Tamplins and Cardens. My first four-wheeler was a 1922 7-1t.p., air-cooled, twin two-stroke, gearbox-on-the-backaxle Carden with, if vim remember, i.f.s. This little vehicle had no frame (or ” chassis ” as it is commonly misnamed), the front suspension being aneltored to the front end of the. I believe, papier irtael0 body. On account of its light weight and comparatively twerft II two-stroke engine, it had a tru1y askminding performance on hills. On :my steep hill it would make rings round lice family 1924 0.11.e., ” 10.5 ” Wolseley two-seater—flying, in top, up hills that brought the Witseley

down to fist. It had no differential or reverse but the engine ran very well backwards so, if there was any lengthy reversing up bill to be done, one either managed to start the engine on a backfire or got one’s passenger to give one a shove on the ” radiator ” while engaging first gear. The car being so

however, it was generally easier to ” pushmanoeuvre.” I remember it had a lovely driving position and one looked along a long, well-shaped ” bonnet ” wluch, however, was empty save for legs and petrol tank. The tiller cap of the latter was the ” radiator ” cap.

Your journal is a joy and takes me. for one, right back to those golden days prior to this age of tin-can-on-jelly tootoring.

Ilideford. I am, Yours, etc.,

1). .1. H. lAsTEli.