Book Reviews, May 1956, May 1956

Author

admin

Browse pages
Current page

1

Current page

2

Current page

3

Current page

4

Current page

5

Current page

6

Current page

7

Current page

8

Current page

9

Current page

10

Current page

11

Current page

12

Current page

13

Current page

14

Current page

15

Current page

16

Current page

17

Current page

18

Current page

19

Current page

20

Current page

21

Current page

22

Current page

23

Current page

24

Current page

25

Current page

26

Current page

27

Current page

28

Current page

29

Current page

30

Current page

31

Current page

32

Current page

33

Current page

34

Current page

35

Current page

36

Current page

37

Current page

38

Current page

39

Current page

40

Current page

41

Current page

42

Current page

43

Current page

44

Current page

45

Current page

46

Current page

47

Current page

48

Current page

49

Current page

50

Current page

51

Current page

52

Current page

53

Current page

54

Current page

55

Current page

56

Current page

57

Current page

58

Current page

59

Current page

60

Current page

61

Current page

62

Current page

63

Current page

64

Current page

65

Current page

66

Current page

67

Current page

68

Current page

69

Current page

70

Current page

71

Current page

72

Current page

73

Current page

74

Current page

75

Current page

76

“The Girl from Indiana,” by Jon Manchap White. 222 pp., 7¾ in. by 5¼ in. (Hodder and Stoughton Ltd., 1, St. Paul’s House, Warwick Square, London, E.C.4. 12s. 6d.)

The author of ”Mask of Dust” writes this story of an American girl, daughter of an Indiana motor magnate, who is persuaded from marrying into the English aristocracy by a wild racing driver who woos her with the aid of a Triumph TR2 and who, inevitably, is building a British G.P. contender of revolutionary design in his home workshop on slender resources.

There is one improbable pit-scene when American motor magnate rushes to the aid of boy-racer as an emergency mechanic, leaving his pretty daughter distraught in the grandstand believing that her hero has probably been burnt in a refuelling fire earlier in the race. Dad, although content with a seat in “Stand K” (whereas if you or I owned Universal Motors we should jolly well wangle a pit-pass), admires the driver/designer so much that he decides to finance his Peacock racers — so B.R.M., Vanwall and Connaught should be careful never to cold-shoulder heavy-jowled old men with American accents.

This is light stuff but a good story — buy it and pass it on to your wife, for her to read in bed while you toil in the garage. What, one wonders, would John Galsworthy have made of the motor-racing scene? — W.B.

*

Herald Advisory Services, 3, Teevan Road, Croydon, Surrey, have issued a revised and enlarged edition of “Bed and Breakfast in South and South-West England, 1956.” It has a rather superior finish and contains an additional feature “Some Suggested Routes.” The price is a modest half-crown.

*

“Roads Matter — The West Riding of Yorkshire” has been issued by the Roads Campaign Council, 15, Dartmouth Street, London, S.W.1, to emphasise the inadequacy of our roads in that area. It contains good photographs of road congestion to emphasise its purpose and is obtainable free on mentioning Motor Sport. Copies have been sent free to many influential persons throughout the Riding.

*

The Photochrom Co. Ltd., Graphic Studios, Tunbridge Wells, Kent, have issued a series of six greetings cards for use between one motorist and another. They are folders which contain an amusing illustrated message when opened; they cost 9d. each inclusive of envelope and purchase tax.

Apology

Sir, 

Your recent review of Lieut.-Colonel Darell Berthon’s book “A Racing History of the Bentley” draws attention to the lack of printed acknowledgment to the books Colonel Berthon consulted in compiling his own history. In fact, the author was well aware of his indebtedness, in particular to “The Story of Brooklands,” and had prepared a list of books consulted for insertion. Because of certain changes in our staff while the book was in the press this list was inadvertently omitted, and we must accept responsibility for the error. We would assure your readers that all future impressions of “A Racing History of the Bentley” will carry the full acknowledgement which Colonel Berthon had prepared.

I am, Yours, etc., p.p. John Lane, The Bodley Head Limited, J. Buchanan-Brown. London, W.C.1.

You may also like

Related products