Cars In Books, May 1986

Browse pages
Current page

1

Current page

2

Current page

3

Current page

4

Current page

5

Current page

6

Current page

7

Current page

8

Current page

9

Current page

10

Current page

11

Current page

12

Current page

13

Current page

14

Current page

15

Current page

16

Current page

17

Current page

18

Current page

19

Current page

20

Current page

21

Current page

22

Current page

23

Current page

24

Current page

25

Current page

26

Current page

27

Current page

28

Current page

29

Current page

30

Current page

31

Current page

32

Current page

33

Current page

34

Current page

35

Current page

36

Current page

37

Current page

38

Current page

39

Current page

40

Current page

41

Current page

42

Current page

43

Current page

44

Current page

45

Current page

46

Current page

47

Current page

48

Current page

49

Current page

50

Current page

51

Current page

52

Current page

53

Current page

54

Current page

55

Current page

56

Current page

57

Current page

58

Current page

59

Current page

60

Current page

61

Current page

62

Current page

63

Current page

64

Current page

65

Current page

66

Current page

67

Current page

68

Current page

69

Current page

70

Current page

71

Current page

72

Current page

73

Current page

74

Current page

75

Current page

76

Current page

77

Current page

78

Current page

79

Current page

80

Current page

81

Current page

82

Current page

83

Current page

84

Current page

85

Current page

86

Current page

87

Current page

88

Current page

89

Current page

90

Current page

91

Current page

92

Current page

93

Current page

94

Current page

95

Current page

96

Current page

97

Current page

98

Current page

99

Current page

100

Current page

101

Current page

102

Current page

103

Current page

104

Current page

105

Current page

106

Current page

107

Current page

108

Current page

109

Current page

110

Current page

111

Current page

112

Current page

113

Current page

114

Current page

115

Current page

116

Current page

117

Current page

118

Current page

119

Current page

120

Current page

121

Current page

122

Current page

123

Current page

124

This column has survived for a very long time and has in recent times been fed with tip-offs from keen readers, both at home, and recently from as far afield as Norway. For example, I have a recommendation that “Beating Time” by Antony Hopkins, the musician and broadcaster, (Future Publications, 1983), should be of interest. The author’s father had a liking for Trojans and a holiday in Sussex in 1927 in a solid-tyred tourer is referred to, as is the schoolboy excitement of rides in a teacher’s Riley.

When Hopkins was a member of the Little Gaddesden Company of the Home Guard he was associated with their Le Mans-type Bentley, so that it was felt that if they could not halt the German armour, they could at least outrun it… It was at this time that Hopkins learned to drive, on a little Commer van used to collect waste-bins from an emergency hospital. He had his first car in 1950, a black 2.6-litre MG drophead-coupe, on which he practised racing gear changes in the grounds of Bryanston school. Within a year he had replaced the MG with a drophead Jaguar, “the seductive handsome pre-war Mk V model”. Hopkins must have liked this, because it was his first of 14 cars of this make, culminating in a lightweight E-type. It had been love-at-first-sight with the XK120, of which Hopkins acquired a white one around 1952, when they began filtering onto the Home market. The book contains some interesting Jaguar memories, and among these cars owned by the author was an XK 150, intended for an American film-star who died so soon after it was delivered that he never drove.

The book has references to days spent at Goodwood and Le Mans, even to winning a sports-car race at Snetterton. A picture shows the author in an E-type Jaguar at the Sussex circuit, another is of Hopkins at Goodwood in a D-type Jaguar. In 1964 he used an Austin-Healey over the dirt roads of Australia, averaging 74 mph on the last leg of the Canberra-Adelaide route. Antony Hopkins lists his cars as those 14 Jaguars, three MGs, five Datsuns (types 240 and 260), two Mazda RX7s, two Lotuses, two Matra Bagheeras, a Ferrari, a Gordon-Keeble, a special Triumph Herald, the Austin-Healey, a Heinkel bubble-car, a Gilbern, a GTV Alfa Romeo and a VW Scirocco. — W.B.