Haywood's view

Browse pages
Current page

1

Current page

2

Current page

3

Current page

4

Current page

5

Current page

6

Current page

7

Current page

8

Current page

9

Current page

10

Current page

11

Current page

12

Current page

13

Current page

14

Current page

15

Current page

16

Current page

17

Current page

18

Current page

19

Current page

20

Current page

21

Current page

22

Current page

23

Current page

24

Current page

25

Current page

26

Current page

27

Current page

28

Current page

29

Current page

30

Current page

31

Current page

32

Current page

33

Current page

34

Current page

35

Current page

36

Current page

37

Current page

38

Current page

39

Current page

40

Current page

41

Current page

42

Current page

43

Current page

44

Current page

45

Current page

46

Current page

47

Current page

48

Current page

49

Current page

50

Current page

51

Current page

52

Current page

53

Current page

54

Current page

55

Current page

56

Current page

57

Current page

58

Current page

59

Current page

60

Current page

61

Current page

62

Current page

63

Current page

64

Current page

65

Current page

66

Current page

67

Current page

68

Current page

69

Current page

70

Current page

71

Current page

72

Current page

73

Current page

74

Current page

75

Current page

76

Current page

77

Current page

78

Current page

79

Current page

80

Current page

81

Current page

82

Current page

83

Current page

84

Current page

85

Current page

86

Current page

87

Current page

88

Current page

89

Current page

90

Current page

91

Current page

92

Current page

93

Current page

94

Current page

95

Current page

96

Current page

97

Current page

98

Current page

99

Current page

100

Hurley Haywood first drove at Sebring in I 971, sharing a Porsche 914/6 with the late Peter Gregg, and has failed to start only once since then, in 1990 when he was contracted to Audi for the TransAm Championship.

This was his 20th start, and his views on the 40 year-old event are generally complimentary. “I remember when you used to take the two long aircraft runways absolutely flat-out at night,” he says. “It was over 200 mph in a Porsche 935 and there were no reference points at all, while aircraft were landing right alongside you. it was a thrill a minute, I can tell you.

“One year it rained, really rained, torrential, and I got lost. I couldn’t see the race track any more, the whole place was like a pond. It’s not like that any more. It’s quite a safe track actually, though I’m not very happy with the safety of any track we race on in the States.

“They never lost the flavour of the place, I tell you. . . they still don’t have decent bathrooms! The bumps are easier, but the ground-effect cars we race today are so sensitive to every ripple in the road that it will always be a problem. They’ve made every effort to smooth out the bumps and make the place safe. The bumps are a problem everybody has to deal with, and if you have smart engineers you can get around it.”

Those bumps are in every conversation that concerns Sebring, and have been since the early days when transmissions were broken almost routinely. It has never been a good track for Jaguar, though the D-type won in 1955, and the modern V12 cars tend to be too stiffly sprung, and too sensitive in the transmission department, to be regarded as bomb-proof. This year, though, it was an errant rear wheel which put Jones and Brabham back by eight laps.

For all the criticisms, all who have been to Sebring talk about the place with affection. Everyone, it seems, has good and bad memories of the place. As Haywood says: “There’s a lot of negative things, but they’re outweighed by the positive things. For me, it’s always a treat to come back to Sebring.”