Letters, May 1992

Author

admin

Browse pages
Current page

1

Current page

2

Current page

3

Current page

4

Current page

5

Current page

6

Current page

7

Current page

8

Current page

9

Current page

10

Current page

11

Current page

12

Current page

13

Current page

14

Current page

15

Current page

16

Current page

17

Current page

18

Current page

19

Current page

20

Current page

21

Current page

22

Current page

23

Current page

24

Current page

25

Current page

26

Current page

27

Current page

28

Current page

29

Current page

30

Current page

31

Current page

32

Current page

33

Current page

34

Current page

35

Current page

36

Current page

37

Current page

38

Current page

39

Current page

40

Current page

41

Current page

42

Current page

43

Current page

44

Current page

45

Current page

46

Current page

47

Current page

48

Current page

49

Current page

50

Current page

51

Current page

52

Current page

53

Current page

54

Current page

55

Current page

56

Current page

57

Current page

58

Current page

59

Current page

60

Current page

61

Current page

62

Current page

63

Current page

64

Current page

65

Current page

66

Current page

67

Current page

68

Current page

69

Current page

70

Current page

71

Current page

72

Current page

73

Current page

74

Current page

75

Current page

76

Current page

77

Current page

78

Current page

79

Current page

80

Current page

81

Current page

82

Current page

83

Current page

84

Current page

85

Current page

86

Current page

87

Current page

88

Current page

89

Current page

90

Current page

91

Current page

92

Current page

93

Current page

94

Current page

95

Current page

96

Current page

97

Current page

98

Current page

99

Current page

100

Female Intuition

Sir,
As a female follower of a predominantly male sport, I would love to see a woman driver making a name for herself in the upper echelons of motor racing.
Having said that, I feel I must add my name to the long list of critics who have carped about Giovanna Amati’s accession to Grand Prix racing. Formula 1 should be reserved for the world’s fastest 26 drivers, not the richest 26.
Christine Finch,
Warrington.

Steer Clear

Sir,
After reading the letter from JM Heward in your March issue, I would advise your readers to bypass Guildford lest they should encounter him on the public highway.
Steven Long,
Farnham.

Spy Menace

Sir,
A recent national newspaper article on police spy cameras suggested that plans were afoot to install such apparatus the length and breadth of the land. The intention, apparently, is to make speeding, and I quote, “as anti-social as drinking and driving”.
How ludicrous can you get?
Quite plainly, anyone who climbs into a car whilst intoxicated deserves to be caught and punished accordingly. Equally, somebody who raced past a junior school at 60 mph at four in the afternoon should also have their licence put through the nearest shredder.
What, however, is the harm in cruising at 90 mph on a motorway at three o’clock in the morning?
Nowadays, few cars are incapable of touring comfortably at such speeds. Yet if you are caught on an empty, three-or four-lane carriageway at that speed, the punishment is likely to be just as severe as that for travelling at 50 mph in a built-up area in the middle of the afternoon. Patently, the judicial system in this country is iniquitous when it comes to motoring offences, and the advent of further technology to assist the police seems to me likely to make the situation worse.
Graham Harris,
Bracknell.

Lights Out

Sir,
WB asserts in his otherwise thought-provoking new column (Boddy Language, April) that we should “rejoice” at the reliability of traffic lights in the UK. Pardon my cynicism, but having a couple of sets of efficient traffic signals somewhere in the middle of Wales is hardly grounds for making sweeping generalisations of this sort.
In London, it only takes a heavy rain shower or two to exaggerate the usual traffic chaos as sets of lights fizzle out all over the capital. Near my south London home, there is a set of lights in which the green bulbs have been inoperative for the past four months. Those who don’t know the area are quite often left sitting nervously at the front of the queue, unsure whether or not it’s safe to progress. Several near-misses have resulted, as those further back prepare to accelerate or when the unfortunate victim of inefficient technology finally realises the situation and gets away as the lights flick back to amber … I could ramble on with countless other tales of duff traffic lights in this great metropolis, but I know that you usually only reserve a page or two for readers’ letters.
Merrick Corfield,
Addiscombe.

Light Unfantastic

Sir,
With reference to WB’s suggestion last month that British traffic signals are reliable, I suggest that he spends a month or two camped out at busy junctions in London.
That should be enough to make him revise his opinions.
From my own experience of commuting to and from the city centre over the past I years or so, I can assure him that they are anything but reliable.
Gerald Purvis,
Wealdstone.

Seeing Red

Sir,
Has WB encountered a typical urban traffic situation in the past decade? From his conclusion that traffic lights in this country are reliable (Boddy Language, April), I presume not.
Tom Tyler,
Maidstone.

Who Does Hunt Think He Is?

Sir,
Having watched the BBC’s coverage of the South African Grand Prix, I felt compelled to lift my pen to complain most strongly about James Hunt.
Who does he think he is?
This entire business of criticising Riccardo Patrese has simply gone on too long. Kyalami certainly was not the first time that the former World Champion one who used to turn up to formal dinners dressed in tee shirt and jeans, I seem to recall –has been vociferous in his condemnation of the Italian. What has Patrese done to justify such blistering attacks, apart from drive in F1 a lot longer than Hunt?
Hunt spent an inordinate amount of time spouting off about the man who, after all, was running in second place and thus supporting his teammate who was leading. And unless my ears deceived me, poor Murray Walker was virtually at war with him trying to play down his outrageous comments. This sort of thing might brighten up racing for some people, but it certainly doesn’t for me. It’s time Mr Hunt retired from commentating, just like he did from racing – partway through a season.
Sam Collins,
Gainsborough.

Winning hand

Well, I’ve given you a few months now, and I have to say that you win, hands down.
What am I talking about? Why, the new look you have introduced to Motor Sport! When I saw the January issue I was convinced that there was no way you could keep up the good work, but you have proved me wrong. The magazine now seems brighter, more focussed and much more informative.
I particularly liked the article on Al Teague. Having met him at Bonneville last year I can say that your story captured him perfectly. The NASCAR feature on Richard Petty highlighted this colourful yet modest personality. It strikes me that the burghers of Formula One could learn a great deal from those good of boys down South …
T Hughes,
Dunstable.

Welcome back

Sir,
I must tell you how delighted I was to read last month of Steve Sydenham’s decision to give Racing for Britain another chance.
I hope that the venture will be set up on a sound commercial footing this time, and that a whole new generation of talented young British drivers will get the chance to progress through the junior formulae in properly-funded circumstances. I know that this wasn’t always the case in the days of the old RfB, but I’ve always been something of an optimist.
I wish those involved every success in getting the venture off the ground. Good luck to all of you.
Matthew Barnes,
Walton-on-Thames.

Police deployment

Sir,
I have every sympathy with the contents of John Strickland’s letter in the April edition of Motor Sport concerning speed and the use of police resources.
On a recent trip back from London on the M40, I saw five marked police patrol cars on the southbound side and one unmarked dark blue 4×4 Ford on the northbound lane. Could I ask therefore, since there is obviously no shortage of police on the roads of Somerset, Oxfordshire and Warwickshire that, at least 50 per cent of the resources be re-deployed back on the beat to police the streets.
I am still waiting to hear from the Warwickshire police as to what they propose to do concerning the entry to our property, smashing of the driver’s door glass by one or more mindless souls, the theft of the car (a new XR2 Ford) and the wreck that was found a week later, on its roof in a back street in Walsall, stripped of its wheels, exhaust, radio, trim, with all panels and glass damaged.
This new car was declared a write off after only one month of ownership.
The crime rate in car theft will most certainly continue to rise with such lop-sided policing.
Rod Perrin,
Warwickshire.

Related articles

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consetetur sadipscing elitr, sed diam nonumy eirmod tempor invidunt ut labore et dolore

Related products

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consetetur sadipscing elitr, sed diam nonumy eirmod tempor invidunt ut labore et dolore