Editorial, May 2002

Browse pages
Current page

1

Current page

2

Current page

3

Current page

4

Current page

5

Current page

6

Current page

7

Current page

8

Current page

9

Current page

10

Current page

11

Current page

12

Current page

13

Current page

14

Current page

15

Current page

16

Current page

17

Current page

18

Current page

19

Current page

20

Current page

21

Current page

22

Current page

23

Current page

24

Current page

25

Current page

26

Current page

27

Current page

28

Current page

29

Current page

30

Current page

31

Current page

32

Current page

33

Current page

34

Current page

35

Current page

36

Current page

37

Current page

38

Current page

39

Current page

40

Current page

41

Current page

42

Current page

43

Current page

44

Current page

45

Current page

46

Current page

47

Current page

48

Current page

49

Current page

50

Current page

51

Current page

52

Current page

53

Current page

54

Current page

55

Current page

56

Current page

57

Current page

58

Current page

59

Current page

60

Current page

61

Current page

62

Current page

63

Current page

64

Current page

65

Current page

66

Current page

67

Current page

68

Current page

69

Current page

70

Current page

71

Current page

72

Current page

73

Current page

74

Current page

75

Current page

76

Current page

77

Current page

78

Current page

79

Current page

80

Current page

81

Current page

82

Current page

83

Current page

84

Current page

85

Current page

86

Current page

87

Current page

88

Current page

89

Current page

90

Current page

91

Current page

92

Current page

93

Current page

94

Current page

95

Current page

96

Current page

97

Current page

98

Current page

99

Current page

100

Current page

101

Current page

102

Current page

103

Current page

104

Current page

105

Current page

106

Current page

107

Current page

108

Current page

109

Current page

110

Current page

111

Current page

112

Current page

113

Current page

114

Current page

115

Current page

116

Current page

117

Current page

118

Current page

119

Current page

120

Current page

121

Current page

122

Current page

123

Current page

124

Current page

125

Current page

126

Current page

127

Current page

128

Current page

129

Current page

130

Current page

131

Current page

132

Current page

133

Current page

134

Current page

135

Current page

136

Current page

137

Current page

138

Current page

139

Current page

140

Current page

141

Current page

142

Current page

143

Current page

144

Current page

145

Current page

146

Current page

147

Current page

148

He smiled when I said that he appeared bemused by it all. He had been ferried about from one interview ‘window’ to another — a dinner there, a speech here — and asked a host of questions about his cars, hordes of which were blipping and ripping about us in every which direction.

Most racing-car designers are ambivalent of last year’s offering, dissmissive almost. It’s the next car that matters. Eric Broadley, the fertile brain behind Lola, is no different. His Prototype, of course, was born of the wannabe-racer glint in his eye, but that particular raison d’etre lasted just a few months: solid juxtaposition of Lola Mk1 and Goodwood earthbank, of teeth and dashboard, of knees and bodywork, during the summer of 1958, persuading him that the engineering side of the operation was perhaps better suited to his skills.

Look carefully, and that glint is still there — but only when reflected in the Prototype’s aluminium bodywork The other cars somehow fail (outwardly at least) to enthuse him. He compliments them on the quality of their restoration, expresses amazement that they are still raced so hard — but really, he’s far more interested by boats and road cars these days. This is not a criticism, just a fact. He did it all when it really mattered; we are just basking in the reflected glory.

And that’s when it struck me: it’s an odd thing, this interest in days-gone-by motor racing. That’s not a criticism (hey, I’m paid to ‘bask), just a fact. For example, is there another sporting magazine on our groaning shelves that concentrates exclusively on past exploits? Not to my knowledge.

So what triggers our nostalgia? Heroes, machines, places, noises, smells (ahh, Castrol R)?

All of those things. No other sport has so many diverse ‘hooks’. Broadley, though, has wiggled free. And we should cut him some slack. For us, Lola is a source of beautiful cars to be ogled in various paddocks, and watched (or, if you’re lucky, driven — see pages 37-47) on tracks. For him, Lola was a business, Motorsport a source of inspiration, excitement, stress and worry in equal measure. His glasses are not rose-tinted.

I wanted to know what he thought about this, that and the T212. But his answers were as pithy as they were polite. Which is why there is no interview to go with our Lola track tests. But that is apt. Never one for self-promotion, many of his company’s greatest successes were achieved while running under another’s name. And he was perfectly happy with that. We, though, are bemused by that — but respectful of his attitude. It takes all sorts to make up this sport of ours, and such diversity is why I am here writing this, and you, hopefully, will be reading it.

For that, Mr Broadley, please accept a simple thank-you.

Jim Clark’s Lotus 25 exits the Station Hairpin during the 1964 Monaco GP

You may also like

Related products