The Way of Things

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53

Brooklands Prospects.

THE 1930 season at the track will always be remembered as marking the commencement of a new regime, and the success which has attended their efforts, in spite of various misfortunes over which they could have no control, has provided sufficient answer to the pessimists who foretold that Brooklands was a spent force as a public attraction. The thorough reorganisation and improvement of the club premises has made the B.A.R.C., more than ever a club worth while belonging to, and we anticipate a considerable increase in the membership next year. One thing which has long been a sore point with drivers at the track, has been its rough condition. This has

led to a number of drivers attempting records on foreign tracks, such as Monthlery, as in spite of the extra expense, the chances of success are greatly increased. Many people talk glibly of repairing the track, as if is were a matter of a few days work, totally forgetting the fact that Brooklands is the largest concrete track in the world, and anything in the way of constructional work on it, is a formidable and costly un dertaking. This winter, however, the authorities are planning an attack on the hills and dales of the track, and are co-operating with the drivers to collect data which will enable the maxi

mum improvement to be carried out with the minimum of expense or wasted energy. Considerable repairs have been carried out, of course, for many winters past, hut they have always been

in the nature of patching up. As the complete resurfacing of such a vast area of concrete is task far beyond the financial resources at the command of the track authorities, they have decided to make the best possible use of their available funds.

The hope has so often been expressed that next year will see a smoother Brooklands, that many drivers have despaired of there ever being a real improvement, but we may now really see something done. The importance of Brooklands from the point of view of the trade depends very largely on its suitability for record attempts, as records broken in this country stand a much better chance of being given good publicity, than similar successes achieved in another country. Mr. Percy Bradley, in his first year of office as Clerk of the Course, together with his colleagues, has already shown his organising ability and initiative by the introduction of progressive ideas, and we may, therefore, look forward to the time when we shall have not only a brighter, but a smoother Brooklands in