British Steel and the Motor Trade.

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British Steel and the Motor Trade.

ASTATEMENT made by a candidate prior to the elcction in Lincolnshire that foreign steel is used in the production of British motor-cars was denied by leading figures in the motor industry. Mr. Victor Riley said, ” We use British steel. Britain can produce the best steel in the world at economic rates.” An official of the Pressed Steel Company, who supply parts and complete bodies for most of the leading manufacturers said, “The steel used in the manufacture of British motor-cars comes mainly from South Wales, the Midlands and Tyneside. Until a few years ago, Britain did not produce sheets of steel large enough for making a one-piece car body. But the British steel manufacturers have got down to this problem and are now producing steel in large enough sizes. There is no doubt that this steel is finer than anything that any other

country can produce, and enables the British manufacturer to make his motorcars entirely British, besides giving employment to British workers.

A Gliding Club Brochure.

THE London Gliding Club, which can justly claim to be the leading club in the country, has recently published an excellent little brochere dealing with much which will interest the gliding enthusiast and prospective glider pilot.

Besides giving a history of the L.G.C., this publication contains a large number of illustrations depicting eifferent types of gliders and soarers, and there is also a map showing the route from Marble Arch to the Dunstable Downs where the Club’s site is situated. It is the intention of the London Club to continue its operations throughout the winter months, and in order to improve the amenities at Tottenhoe, a member’s club house is to be built while additional accommodation for machines is to be provided for by the erection of a second hangar.

Alfa-Romeo Records at Montlhery.

FOUR.long-distance International class records were obtained at Montlhery last month by Zehender and Maurice Benoist with a 1,750 c.c. AlfaRomeo.

The records were as follow :-500 miles at 157.60 k.p.h„ 1,000 idioms. at 156.28 k.p.h., 1,000 miles at 156.74 k.p.h., and 935.93 Idioms, in six hours (155.86 k.p.h.).

The British Africa Expedition. motor of two

THE motor convoy, consisting of two 14 h.p. Alpine Rileys, two Ford vans, a Dixon-Bate trailer and two motorcycles, which is making a tour of Africa, reached Khartoum last month. The last stage reported covered 400 miles of desert in appalling heat-112 degrees in the shade. There were minor stoppages, chiefly due to tyre trouble.

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