IFIVAZIEIP S14‘11-1 CAVI IFCIU 143J

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SUPERCHARGED MODEL ADDED TO THE RANGE. ALWAYS a strong favourite with the sporting driver who puts a premi m on performance, the range of Frazer Nash cars has been extended for the forthcoming season by the re-introduction of a supercharged car, which is known as the Shelsley model. The power-unit is the special four-cylinder overhead camshaft engine described some months ago in these columns, and has a capacity of 1,496 c.c. Most of the components have an ample factor of safety for supercharging, but a special fully balanced crank-shaft with 2 -&-inch journals has been produced to give added security, and high-duty nickel-chrome steel connecting rods to go with it. ,

A unique feature of the ” Shelsley ” is the fact that two superchargers are used. They are of the eccentric single-rotor type, made by Centric, and are mounted in front of the engine, one either side of the timing case, and are gear-driven from the crank-shaft. Either of the two units is naturally smaller than a single blower would have been, making it possible to install them without altering the chassis or moving the radiator forward. They are fed by a single down-draft S.U. carburetter through a Y-shaped induction pipe. The oil supply for the blowers comes from the camshaft system, and disc valves coupled to the carburetter cross shaft cut down the supply at small throttle openings, and prevent oiled plugs. The suspension and front axle lay-out is a development of normal Frazer Nash practise, with improvements found useful

at the high speeds of which the Shelsley is capable.

The springs, instead Of being quarterelliptic, are full cantilevers, and are carried outside the chassis members. The rocking cradles in the centre: of the springs are carried in threaded bearings to resist side play, while the rear ends slide. The shock-absorbers are mounted above the springs and control them through C-shaped shackles, while the Axle is positioned by heavy tubular radius rods. The axle clips are solid with the axle and the caster angle is altered by screwing in or out the threaded eye-bolts at the rear end of the radius rods. The stiff tubular front axle has been retained but is on this car quite straight.

The front brakes are cable-operated and have ribbed 14-inch drums. These are of the special composite type made by Holden and Hunt and retain their shape under the most arduous conditions. Incidentally with cable operation of the brakes a considerable increase in steering lock can be Obtained.

The car exhibited at the show, which was finished in red with red upholstery was fitted with an attractive two-seater body, wide enough to allow the brake and gear levers to be carried up inside the driving compartment. The tail was smoothly rounded, and the large luggage boat was protected by an unusual tonneau cover with a zipp fastening running all round. The two spare wheels were carried on either side of the bonnet.

The Shelsley model is priced at 2850 and has a road speed of 105 m.p.h. A similar car fitted with the unsupercharged o.h.c. four-cylinder or six-cylinder engine costs £100 less.

The 1934 T. T. Replica car is of course the best known of the series, and costs with the overhead-camshaft 70 B.H.P. engine £650, or with a 1*-litre six, £625.

These fine cars are of course equipped with spare petrol and oil tanks, two spare wheels and every kind of accessory which makes for success in competition or comfort on the road, one of the great points being the ease with which the gear-ratios may be changed. It will be remembered that these cars put up an excellent performance in this year’s T.T., and a speed of 90 m.p.h. is claimed for the four-cylinder car.

The fast tourist is well catered for by the Bylleet series which has the 14 h.p. (1,657 c.c.) engine and either a roomy two-three seater body or the T.T. type, at a respective cost of £595 or 2575. Finally those who want to own a” Nash ‘s but cannot quite rise to the price of the T.T. model will be glad to know of the Boulogne II model fitted with a 1,496 c.c. Meadows O.H.V. engine, and costing £475. It is of course fully equipped, though not so luxuriously as the been expensive cars, but as has always more Frazer Nash practise, almost any of the improvements of the more expensive models can be. installed to the owner’s order.

but the cars of the future will only be able to maintain their maximum on 3 out of the 5 kilornetre.s. Present plans show a rectangular track, with four extremely steep, wide radius bankings.

Monza will continue to have a dangerous reputation, methinks!