ONE FOR THE "SPECIALS"

Author

admin

Browse pages
Current page

1

Current page

2

Current page

3

Current page

4

Current page

5

Current page

6

Current page

7

Current page

8

Current page

9

Current page

10

Current page

11

Current page

12

Current page

13

Current page

14

Current page

15

Current page

16

Current page

17

Current page

18

Current page

19

Current page

20

Current page

21

Current page

22

Current page

23

Current page

24

Current page

25

Current page

26

Current page

27

Current page

28

Current page

29

Current page

30

Current page

31

Current page

32

Current page

33

Current page

34

Current page

35

Current page

36

Current page

37

Current page

38

Current page

39

Current page

40

Current page

41

Current page

42

Current page

43

Current page

44

ONE FOR THE ” SPECIALS”

Sir, In “Club News” in the September issue of MOTOR SPORT, I notice a certain amount of jubilation is caused by the

location of an I.O.E. G.N. Suppose I were to whisper details of a full o.h.v. G.N. engine ? This was removed from its chassis to make room for a fourcylinder plot. More of that anon. The engine is complete with two spare cylinders, con-rods and a few other oddments, but is lacking one set of top rockers. These, judging by the remaining set, should present no undue difficulties to manufacture. In certain earlier articles, you have commented upon various epic performances put up by i5 cars. Surely, there is nothing outstanding in this ? With expensive cars of this type one would expect to journey at least as far as John o’Groat’s and return, without falling to pieces as extensively as a certain French marque is reported to have done. A year or two ago. I purchased a 1925 Gwynne eight for the modest sum of

20/-. Mileage covered to date is some 29,000 odd. Its previous total I am unable to find out, as it has only a 10,000 mile speedometer. This is not by any means a record mileage, but it has been covered without recourse to a garage, although there have been one or two involuntary stops, which have, however, responded to treatment.

” Nellie Gwyrme’s ” last long run may prove of interest.

She left London late on the Friday before August Bank Holiday bound for Pendine. Crew consisted of three, and cargo, besides camping equipment, was composed of a trailer and two racing cycles, the idea being to participate in the sand-racing organised by the Carmarthen and District LC. & M C.C. The equipe arrived about mid-day on Saturday, the run being entirely uneventful. Racing over, and the cycles proved to be not so hot as we had hoped, the return journey was begun. Carrying two only this time, ” Nellie ” proceeded to hold 55 for as long as the roads would let her. I should add that, on occasion, the trailer was prone to have a will of its own. Another trouble-free run ensued, except for a little bother outside Uxbridge when that indescribable trailer broke its tow-bar and careered across the road, leaping a pile of gravel, crashing through a hedge and turning “base uppards ” in the field beyond with the bikes underneath. Fortunately, the speed at the time was low and the road was empty. The crew managed to scrape up the mess and tie it all together sufficiently well to finish the journey. I should explain that I was not one of the crew on this occasion. I was holidaying in Cornwall with the Special (G.N. chassis, etc.) and drove up to Pendine to meet the Gwynne, return ing to Cornwall after the event. The following day, ” Nellie ” came down to join me and later we returned together. On this journey she demonstrated the 55 business time and again, and on one memorable occasion, showed me her heels to the tune of an honest 60! Mile

age for that week about 1,200. By the way, the Gwynne still has its original pistons!

A description of the Special might interest you. G./3. chassis, 12-50 Alvis power plot, Citroen front axle, Riley wheels, earlier Citroen steering gear, and a sprinkling of Bugatti, Bentley, Bianchi, Buick, Gwynne, Essex, Rover, Sunbeam, Swift, Ford, Wolseley and assorted oddments, not forgetting almost a complete A.C. tricar front axle to carry the spare wheel. Took almost four years to build, evenings and odd week-ends. Has a maximum of 84, the Alvis being quite standard,

does 30 m.p.g. Three speeds, 4 to I, 5.’2 to I, and 9 to I, and is altogether a pleasant motor to drive. If you can give me any information about the 2-litre Arab, about 1926, I

should be very grateful. I have been offered one of these, but except for the fact that it is a product of the late Parry Thomas, I know nothing at all about it. I am, Yours etc.,

C. H. PEACOCK. Isleworth,

Middlesex. [Can any readers help Mr. Peacock? Ed.]

You may also like

Related products