Rumblings, November 1956

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A new miniature

Another miniature vehicle is soon to join the Lloyds, Goggomobils and Beans which are a familiar feature of the German road scene. This is the Zundapp Janus, unique in having a dos-a-dos saloon body seating four adults back-to-back on a wheelbase of 6 ft 0 in. A single-cylinder 67 by 70-mm (248 cc) two-stroke fan-cooled engine, mounted centrally, drives the back wheels via a four-speed gearbox with ratios of 26.0, 13.1, 8.3 and 6.25 to 1. Independent suspension is by coil-springs all round and the tyre size is 4.40 by 12. In Germany, this little economy saloon, with 12-volt electrics and hydraulic brakes, will sell for about £270.

Auto Union versus Mercedes-Benz

Last month, in an article under the heading of “The Genius of Dr. Porsche” we published a table of race-results for the years 1934 and 1935 showing how well the comparatively small concern of Auto-Union battled against the might of Mercedes-Benz in the opening stages of this sensational new era of Grand Prix racing.

To continue beyond 1935 was not the theme of this article, but so much interest has been aroused, and the younger generation seems so keen to know how this battle waged, that we continue the tabulation hereunder. Naturally, this sketches only part of the story and for the full facts the appropriate back issues of Motor Sport and various reference works should be consulted.

That was how it went and no one can say that Hitler’s interest didn’t produce close racing ! 

The F II Lister

To join battle next season with the Formula II Cooper and Lotus cars, Brian Lister has designed and built an F II Lister. Archie Scott-Brown should have driven it at the  Oulton Park Gold Cup Meeting but the lightweight car proved uncontrollable out of corners due to excessive wheespin. This will be considered during the winter and a potent vehicle should emerge from George Lister’s works, where all manner of general engineering and wrought-iron work is undertaken and where 16 Listers have been built, either as kits of parts or complete cars, mostly for use with Bristol power units. Incidentally. the Lister-Maserati, raced this year by Archie Scot-tBrown, is being sold.

The F II Lister has a new tubular space-frame, as distinct from the ladder-frame of the Lister-Bristol, tailored to be a snug fit round a 11/2-litre Coventry-Climax engine, which next year it is hoped will be the twin-cam unit.. The drive is through a TC MG gearbox to a de Dion back axle using an A30 final drive. This layout is now due for modification, the gearbox, which will probably be a Bristol, to go behind the axle, not in the centre of the chassis.

The frame is of 18-g tubing either 1 in or 3/4 in dia, the weight being only 32 lb. Front and back suspension is by the simple and effective Girling struts, unequal-length wishbones being used in front to carry Standard Ten stub-axles on ball.bearings at the top and swivel links at the bottom. The universally-jointed steering column operates a Morris Minor rack-and-pinion unit ahead of the suspension assembly. Lister make their own disc brakes, using Girling light alloy pads. The discs are 9 in dia in front, 83/4 in dia at the back, the back ones being set inboard to aid cooling. The rear wheels have a 2-deg negative camber. The radiator core came from a Morris-Oxford and a tiny 6-volt battery beneath the seat supplies the twin fuel pumps and ignition.

This very compact F II Lister is shod with 5.00 by 15 tyres on centre-lock wire wheels and weighs about 63/4 cwt. It is the prototype on which further F II Listers, built by the long-established Cambridge firm of precision engineers, will be based.

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