Another Famous Name Erased

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Berkeley Square House Garage Ltd. have taken over Fox and Nicholl Ltd., the well-known service station on the Kingston By-Pass, from which, under the patronage of Mr. Arthur Fox, successful racing Talbot, Lagonda and Singer cars emanated. Mr. Fox, in fact, used to enter the works-sponsored Roesch Talbots at the height of their success and he retains many trophies and hundreds of photographs from those days. The name of this famous garage has been changed to Bye-Pass Motors, Ltd.

 

For Engineer Enthusiasts

A tool of considerable interest to those engaged in car overhaul and repair, and particularly those building up racing-car engines and other precision machinery, is the M.H.H. Torque Meter wrench. This wrench, used in conjunction with appropriate sockets, indicates on a dial the torque applied in tightening a nut. It enables bolts, studs and nuts to be tightened to a pre-determined torsion, thus obviating stresses set up in castings, bearings, etc., due to casual tightening of securing nuts and bolts. It also enables torque in machinery to be measured, and provides a safe and reliable method of testing the yield-point of sample bolts. Its application in garage or racing-car workshop is obvious.

These torque wrenches are ratchet-operated and, functioning on the Hookes Law of spring deflection, are guaranteed accurate to within 3% throughout their range. Readings are obtained on a dial behind an unbreakable window, the recording mechanism of which is isolated from shock, a secondary pointer being fitted which is set to the torque required but which in the larger wrenches carries on with the recording pointer to indicate the overload applied. Special additions such as light signals in the handle for use in confined spaces are available, and the wrench is packed in a wooden or steel case.

Apart from applications that will be obvious to the skilled engineer, it should be explained that most car manufacturers state the correct torque to be applied to bolts throughout their engines — curiously, Rolls-Royce are the exception, specifying merely 6-in. or 9-in. tommy-bars! Repairers equipped with reliable torque wrenches can conscientiously work to these figures.

The 14-in.-long B60 wrench is suitable for most car engines, reading as it does from 5-60 lb./ft. It costs £9  7s. 6d. M.H.H. wrenches are available for recording to 1,500 lb./ft. Sets of Whitworth sockets for use with these wrenches, hot-forged from heat-treated alloy h.t. steel, zinc or cadmium plated, are available from 16s. 6d. a set. These Torque Meter tools sound a good investment. They were introduced 15 years ago for the Aircraft Industry and are used by the Ford Motor Company, etc., etc. The makers are M.H.H. Engineering Co., Ltd., of Bramley, Guildford, Surrey, from whom literature is available to Motor Sport readers.– W. B.

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