The Daimler SP250

Author

admin

Browse pages
Current page

1

Current page

2

Current page

3

Current page

4

Current page

5

Current page

6

Current page

7

Current page

8

Current page

9

Current page

10

Current page

11

Current page

12

Current page

13

Current page

14

Current page

15

Current page

16

Current page

17

Current page

18

Current page

19

Current page

20

Current page

21

Current page

22

Current page

23

Current page

24

Current page

25

Current page

26

Current page

27

Current page

28

Current page

29

Current page

30

Current page

31

Current page

32

Current page

33

Current page

34

Current page

35

Current page

36

Current page

37

Current page

38

Current page

39

Current page

40

Current page

41

Current page

42

Current page

43

Current page

44

Current page

45

Current page

46

Current page

47

Current page

48

Current page

49

Current page

50

Current page

51

Current page

52

Current page

53

Current page

54

Current page

55

Current page

56

Current page

57

Current page

58

Current page

59

Current page

60

Current page

61

Current page

62

Current page

63

Current page

64

Current page

65

Current page

66

Current page

67

Current page

68

Current page

69

Current page

70

Current page

71

Current page

72

Current page

73

Current page

74

Current page

75

Current page

76

Current page

77

Current page

78

Current page

79

Current page

80

Current page

81

Current page

82

Current page

83

Current page

84

Current page

85

Current page

86

Current page

87

Current page

88

Current page

89

Current page

90

Current page

91

Current page

92

Current page

93

Current page

94

Current page

95

Current page

96

Current page

97

Current page

98

Current page

99

Current page

100

Current page

101

Current page

102

Current page

103

Current page

104

Current page

105

Current page

106

Current page

107

Current page

108

Current page

109

Current page

110

Current page

111

Current page

112

Current page

113

Current page

114

Current page

115

Current page

116

Current page

117

Current page

118

Current page

119

Current page

120

Current page

121

Current page

122

Current page

123

Current page

124

Sir,

Over the last few months many readers have written letters in praise of such cars as Alfas, Rovers and Land Rovers, MG-Bs and Healeys; while TRs were written of far into the night.

One gap which I would like to fill concerns the Daimler SP250. Here is a car which had a production run of only five years, during which time it is estimated only about 4-1/2 to 5 thousand were made. The number left in this country is not known to me, but by the quantity which are always for sale in your classifieds there must be quite a few hundred.

As is generally known, the police used them for some time with mixed success (all police models are black automatics), though I am told there is at least one being used by them currently.

The SP250 earned itself two bad reputations, though. Firstly, many people considered them ugly. Well, “shape” is always a personal sentiment, not only to be found when referring to cars. . . . The other reputation was that they were treacherous, especially in the wet, due to having 140 b.h.p./ton with little weight at the rear. Nowadays that power/weight ratio is considered quite low; but I submit that anyone who has fitted a modern radial—such as XAS – to an SP250 will be amazed at the improvement in stability over the original RS5. I have driven my car on both types of tyre and can well understand the basis for the old stories, though I am not biased against the makers of the RS5. We would be lost without them (Dunlop).

With a performance of 0-60 m.p.h. in 9 sec. and 0-100 m.p.h. in 26 sec. it can still show many other cars a clean pair of exhausts, thanks to the superb engine. In this year’s VSCC Pomeroy Trophy, admittedly minus windscreen (though also minus a tonneau) with a badly slipping clutch, it managed to make the ss 1/4-mile in 18.07 sec. (2 sec. slow) and continued to take the flying 1/4 in 9.90 sec. I was using 6,500 revs in each gear, and terminal speed was in excess of 105 m.p.h. up the Club straight at Silverstone. The respective times for a TR4 were 19.29 and 11.21 (with a windscreen I admit), but let’s not bicker!

The point is, the SP250 is an excellent car, with a really torquey 2-1/2-litre V8 engine, fibreglass body, a good solid chassis supporting a rarely found “hand-built” quality—no wonder they are becoming quite sought-after; and go and look at that boot. You could do “meals on wheels” with that car! In how many Sports/true GT cars can you close the boot lid with a five-gallon oil drum standing upright in it?

NEILL S. BRUCE, DLOC “SP Section”. – Woking.

––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Sir,

May I first congratulate you on the long maintained high standard of your magazine, for which I do not resent paying the new price of I5np.

Now to the real purpose of this letter. I would like to join the ranks of those enthusiastic car owners who have, over the last year or so, thought it necessary to extol the virtues of their particular automobile, to wit, TR2s, 3s and 4s, MG-Bs, etc. Surely if these machines bring forth such dedication and enthusiasm what has happened to the owners of those cars built ten years ago so far ahead of their time that they can still show a very clean pair of exhaust pipes to any of the above makes, many more later sports cars and all the GT badges? I am talking about the glassfibre, flared wheel arches (then), sturdy chassissed, 2+2, large booted (luggage, that is), V8 economical Daimler SP250.

I record 31 m.p.g. with luggage, wife and two children aboard on long runs, easily maintaining 50 m.p.h. average speeds and never less than 24 m.p.g. round town. The flexibility and silence of this car has yet to be attained by many of the larger sound-proofed saloon GT standards.

Being a poor bloke I do all my own servicing and repairs and am therefore specially pleased by the ease with which this car can be worked on; the crankshaft can be removed with the engine in situ in a morning, the front suspension dismantled without the use of special tools, rebushed and fully greased via the many nipples to keep it in good condition. This must count for something in this throw-away unit age.

I would like to add a note of dissent about the spares situation on this car. Jaguar Cars, Browns Lane, Coventry, though helpful, seem unable to provide at least 50% of any spares order taken to them and also give no indication as to when, if ever, they will provide them. Surely for a car last made six years ago one could expect a comprehensive spares service, or is this merely the price of having something different?

Anybody who reads this who has a secret stock of window regulators, trunnion bushes or boot locks for a Daimler SP250 is a very lucky man.

G. J. STURKEY – Solihull.