EDITORIAL NOTES., October 1925

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36

EDITORIAL NOTES.

The principal feature of this issue is the report on the Classic Two Hundred Miles Race, which, organized by the Junior Car Club, drew a record crowd to Brooklands on September 26. Our report which was written largely by an observer at the pits, and therefore contains interesting information as to what happened to the various cars as they came in for adjustments and replenishments. It is from the pits that one gathers exact details of the race from a mechanical point of view and the lessons to be learned from this station in a great race are of the utmost value.

Mr. B. S. Marshall, whose Bugatti was dogged by illluck in the J.C.C. Two Hundred, contributes an article on his recent success at Boulogne in the form of a personal narrative in which he records the various incidents as they occurred to him. Mr. Marshall’s views on the Boulogne race are expressed in a delightful style and will we feel sure appeal to all those who appreciate his achievement in successfully competing without any aid from a racing organization. To win a great race as Mr. Marshall did off his own bat, so to speak, is certain to appeal to the sporting instincts of our readers.

We are fortunate in being able to publish a very complete biographical sketch of Major H. 0. D. Segrave, whose recent win in the 200 Miles Race adds another laurel to those he has already gained for classic events all over the world. His account of his early struggles to set his foot on the ladder of fame make most fascinating reading as does the record which he holds to-day as Britain’s most famous racing driver.

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