MODEL AEROPLANES AT BROOKLANDS

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MODEL AEROPLANES AT BROOKLANDS

AN extremely successful meeting was held at Brooklands Aerodrome on Sunday (September 11th). It was the latest of the periodical Brooklands “At Home” Days, and on this occasion the guests were the members of the Society of Model Aeronautical Engineers.

The weather conditions were most unfavourable, for a very high wind was blowing throughout the afternoon, and it was all that the models could do to battle against the gusts. In spite of this, however, many excellent flights were achieved—some of the models travelling right across the aerodrome and landing on the banking on the far side. Brooklands members and pupils were much impressed by the flying, and expressed surprise that such tiny machines could do so well under such trying conditions. Some of the machines, as well as flying excellently, reproduced all the main features of well known types of machine, and were extremely realistic. Perhaps the

best from this point of view was the miniature of a Gipsy engined Comper Swift (the type owned by the Prince of Wales), which, in addition to being a perfect replica of its prototype, made some extremely good flights.

The main contest of the day, a duration competition, was won by Mr. Pelly Fry with a fuselage high-winged monoplane, which flew for 38 seconds under very trying conditions. The machine was damaged during the afternoon, but Mr. Fry did a repair on the spot, with such success that he won the contest. He won a similar contest at Brooklands two years ago, and expresses his intention of coming back next year to have yet another try.

For his success he has been awarded a free flight in one of the Brooklands machines, the prize which was offered by the Brooklands School of Plying for the winner of the contest.