NEWS FROM THE U.S.A.

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ABJENKINS, after setting several nternational class records last year, • announced early in 1934 that he would attempt to better his 24-hour record during the summer months. The announcement created wide interest here and abroad, but few motor experts conceded Jenkins a chance of shattering his own mark of 117 miles per hour by the almost incredible margin of 10 miles per hour.

Roaring over the sun-baked, concretelike sands of the dry lake beds near Boonesville, Utah, Jenkins broke international and world’s records late in August, driving a streamlined 12-cylinder Pierce-Arrow Special. This machine was radically different from the job used last year only in its efficient streamlining.

Jenkins covered 200 miles at a speed of 132.18 miles per hour ; 3 hours at 132.18 miles per hour ; 500 kilo. at 132.4 miles per hour ; 500 miles at 132.607 miles per hour ; 1,000 miles at 130.906 miles per hour ; 2,000 kilos. at 129.597 miles per hour ; and 1,700 miles at 128.48 miles per hour. He drove the entire test without relief. A broken clutch halted Jenkins’s run shortly after the first 24 hours had been completed at 127.215 miles per hour.

Winn Again Victorious. Billy Winn, the diminutive Kansas City star, enjoying one of his most successful seasons, was the winner of the 100-mile Championship contest held at Springfield, Illinois, in August. Driving a Miller Special, Billy roared to victory at a speed of 77 miles per hour over a select field of A.A.A. aces. Mauri Rose was BY Our American Correspondent T. MERIWETHER-SMITH

second, and Russell Snovvberger third. Johnny Sawyer, the Milwaukee flyer, had the tough break of the contest. Driving in the lead through the 93rd lap, seven laps from the checkered flag, Sawyer was forced to abandon the race when his Lencki-Madis Special developed motor troubles. It would have been Sawyer’s first Championship victory had his motor lasted those last heartbreaking seven laps.

Winn is Atlanta Victor.

Winn, still in fine fettle after his Springfield triumph, breezed to hard-earned triumph in the feature race at Atlanta, Georgia, early in September. This race was marred by one of the most peculiar accidents in motor racing, an accident after the checkered flag had dropped. Chet Gardner and Winn, rounding the curve at the end of the stretch,_ after a thrilling duel, skidded together and crashed into the inner railings. Gardner was severely injured, but Winn escaped unscathed.

Unser is Pike’s Peak Victor. Louis Unser, driving a Schultz Special, was the winner of the annual Pike’s Peak mountain climb, America’s ” Shelsley Walsh,” on September 3rd. Unser, driving the dangerous curves with extreme

daring but also with uncanny skill, succeeded in bettering the old record of 16 minutes 47 seconds set by Glenn Schultz in 1932, bringing the mark down to 16 minutes I k seconds. He was driving an 8-cylinder Special designed by Schultz.

R. D. Hammond, in a Ford roadster, captured honours in the stock car division, setting a new record of 19 minutes, 25.7 seconds for the climb. He bettered the record by almost 32 seconds. Racing conditions were ideal.

Doug. McLeod, of Richmond, swept to victory in the races at Salisbury, N.C., in September, with Chick Young second, and Carl Baker third.

Vernon Orenduff, of Florida, flashed his Ambler-Hisso Special to an easy triumph in the 20-mile feature at Richmond, on September 9th. Malcolm Fox was second, Eddie Skinner third. There were no serious accidents.

Harry Hartz, veteran retired auto race star, aided by” Babe” Stapp, established what is regarded as an American fuel economy record last month when he drove an Imperiod air-flow Chrysler machine from Los Angeles to New York at an average of 18.1 miles per gallon of petrol. Earlier in the month Hartz, aided by Wilbur Shaw, sped to a new American closed-car record of 24 hours at the Dry Lake beds, Utah, covering 2,026.40 miles. The car did the mile at 95.7 miles per hour and covered 500 miles at an average of 90.04 miles per hour.