" When Motoring was a Sport" By E. D. Lovell.

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” When Motoring Was a Sport” By E. D. Lovell.

(A. B. Campbell & Co.). 216.

This is an excellent little work which we much enjoyed and to which every reader should treat himself. Mr. Lovell might certainly have been tempted to write sensationally of the early days for the general reading public, especially as he covers the period 1899-1923 in ninetysix pages. He does nothing of the sort. Technicalities are included and he writes as one enthusiast to another, so that it is even possible to discern some of the individual shortcomings of cars of the old days, provided one cares to trace the model referred to. Mr. Lovell writes chiefly of the cars he has owned-1901 5 h.p. Mors, 1903 7 h.p. Panhard, a 12 h.p. Brazier, a 1912 15 h.p. Fiat and a 1923 Humber Eight—and of adventures and experiences incurred in using them. His last chapter on a run from London to West Tarbert in the Humber, made quite recently, will be enjoyed. The book is illustrated with photographs and pen and ink sketches by A. W. Browne. Our regret is that there is not a lot more of it. We have long felt that the reminiscences of an ordinary, as distinct from racing, driver should have a place in motoring literature, our hope being that ” Baladeur ” might one day publish a large volume of his “Side Slips.” If not, you will have to wait ten !: ears or so, when the present writer (author of ” General Notes “) proceeds to commit his acquired reminiscences to print in book form . • . Mr. Lovell’s little volume hasn’t much dignity, but it will be appreciated by enthusiasts as well as motorists and it is a move in the desired direction.