Continental Notes and News, October 1938

Browse pages
Current page

1

Current page

2

Current page

3

Current page

4

Current page

5

Current page

6

Current page

7

Current page

8

Current page

9

Current page

10

Current page

11

Current page

12

Current page

13

Current page

14

Current page

15

Current page

16

Current page

17

Current page

18

Current page

19

Current page

20

Current page

21

Current page

22

Current page

23

Current page

24

Current page

25

Current page

26

Current page

27

Current page

28

Current page

29

Current page

30

Current page

31

Current page

32

Current page

33

Current page

34

Current page

35

Current page

36

By AUSLANDER

Here’s News

The News of the : Imith, I think, is contained in a letter I have received from a reader of this paper who has himself performed on road and track with some success. His letter records a conversation he had recently with Hans Stuck, during which the latter revealed that the AutoUnion designed to attack Eyston’s absolute speed record is nearly completed. Apparently the car will be of normal dimensions, .weighing about 1,700 or roughly 34 hundredweight. He did not disclose the size of the engine, but

said that it develops 3,000h.p. Stuck will drive the car, and appears to be quite confident that he will take the record. The attempt will take place, of course, on the special stretch of Reichsatitobalat which is now almost finished, fifteen miles long and over a hundred feet wide.

‘ The same combination, Stuck and Auto-Union, will also be seen in action next year in an attempt to beat Sir Malcolm Campbell’s water-speed record of 130 m.p.h., Made with the RollsRoyce eughted ” Blue Bird ” recently at Lake Haiwill, hear Zurich. He added that Mercedes-Benz Are fitting an engine into a special boat for international races.

Stuck, of course, has been practising the different art of handling a motorboat for some time on Lake Zurich, where he has a villa. The driver of the Mercedes-Benz boat has not yet been nominated.

And Now for 1939

While the whole of Paris was holding its breath in almost fatalistic anticipation of the worst, the members of the International Sporting Commission sat down and calmly worked out the programme of international Grand Prix races for next season.

The results of their deliberations are that Indianapolis will be held on May 30th, the Belgian Grand Prix on June 25th, the French Grand Prix on July 9th, the German Grand Prix on July 23rd, the Swiss Grand Prix on August 20th, the Tourist Trophy on September 2nd, and the Italian Grand Prix on September 10th. They also accorded international status to the South African Grand Prix on January 2nd, the Cork races on April 21st-22nd, the Cairo Rally on April 29th, the Elaintarhanajo Diurgardslopet on May 7th (of course you know where that is, don’t you ?), the Feleac Hill Climb on June 4th, the Circuit de Villa Real on June 18th, the Ma.saryk Grand Prix on September 24th, and the Rio de Janeiro Grand Prix on October 8th. The first list is made up of the big events to be held in each country. yin by the national clubs, while the second will be added to before the list closes towards

the end of the year. By that time it will, of course, include such events as the Coppa Acerb°, Coppa Ciano, Donington Grand. Prix, and various races at Brooklands and Crystal Palace given international status, as well as Tripoli, etc. The French, having been instrumental in bringing about the existing formula, are now trying to get it altered. As

many people (including your correspondent) pointed out in the first place. the unsupercharged 41-litre car has no chance against the 3-litre blown machine, and the idea is to think of sonic means of putting the two on a more even footing. J ust how this can be done it is difficult to see. Obviously the Germans, having spent vast sums of money in building, their new cars, are not going to agree to any alteration in the formula which will cause them to modify their ears in an expensive way, and I rather doubt whether anything will come of the French move.

Incidentally, on whose behalf the French Club is acting is somewhat obscure. As I have already hinted, it is doubtful whether the Ecurie Bleue will be racing Delahayes next year, and M. Lago has already decided that his unblown cars have no chance in Grand Prix racing, His new 3-litre sixteen-cylinder Talbot is being built to formula, and will therefore not require any assistance from a revision of the rules.

From all accounts, the sixteen-cylinder Alfa-Romeo is now reaching a pitch of development when it should be able to challenge the Germans for Sheer speed and acceleration. It has been generally assumed that its power output was 340 b.h.p. at 7,000 r.p.m., but I am given to understand that this now reads 400 b.h.p. at 3,000 r.p.m. With Farina and Wimille as their leading drivers, the Alfa Corse Should have a good season in 1939. No one would welcome some really stiff opposition more than the Germans, who are quite weary of scoring hollow victories.

The 1,500 c.c. Position

Unless unforeseen circumstances intervene, 1939 is going to be a bumper year for 1,500 c.c. racing. The new Alfa has put an entirely different complexion on events for cars of this category, especially as I believe it is going to be available for private buyers, There is already talk of Louis Chiron running a couple of them in partnership with an tin-named driver, while one well known English driver, at least, has been in direct negotiation with the factory. Then there is the possibility of the Eettrie Blene entering the 1,500 cc. field. Maseratis, too, have hopes of their latest and greatest machine of this size, so with Works teams of both these makes and independents as well the prospects of some rousing Anglo-Con

tinental duels are distinctly good. It is to be hoped, however, that the E.R.A. team and the numerous independent drivers of this make will continue, and even extend their Continental activities.

An Italian Complaint

Indeed, there were some hard things said about British 1,500 c.c. drivers at Monza. Good starting money was offered to British drivers to take part in the 1,500 c.c. event, but only Arthur Dobson

accepted. The Italians understand that it is difficult for them to take part in their home events at Brooklands, Donington and Crystal Palace, and still find time to race ,abroad, but they argue that Italian. drivers manage to visit England, so why not vice-versa ? It was even stated that the Works E.R.A. team has never raced in Italy, which Italians. consider to be the home of 1,500 c.c. racing. Perhaps some English reader would give me confirmation or otherwise of this, as I am writing these notes without access to my records-. Anyway, the Italians were looking forward to a good scrap between their own Alfas and Maseratis and the British E.I.A. team, backed up by independents, and they were extremely disappointed When only Dobson’s by-no-means new car turned up

Milan Highlight

Dick Seaman and Erika Popp giving a masterly display of the “Lambeth Walk” to a spell-bound audience at the Ambassador ‘s.

Paris Douze Heures

The veteran Andre Morel and the youthful Rene Lebegue formed an irresistible combination at the wheel of a 3A-litre Darracq in the recent Paris 12-Hour Sports-Car Race. Their speed was 75.69 m.p.h., and comfortably beat the second finishers, Villeneuve and Biolay on a

Delahaye. The ladies, represented by Mmes. Rouault and Itier, driving another Delahaye, were third.

British Rileys driven by Frenchmen won the 1,500 c.c. class.

won c.c. RESULTS Le

Over 8-litres : 1, Le Begue-Morel (Darraeq), 75.69 m.p.h. •, 2, VIlleneuve-Biolay (Delahaye) ; 3, Mme. ltier-Mme. Roma (Delahave).

3-litres : 1, inestivier-Mme. Roux (Amilear), 61.98 rn.p,h.

2-litres : 1, Raeberle-Glockner (llanoniag Diesel), 52.58 m.p.h.

1,500 0.0. : 1, Ferry-Noireaux (Riley), 50.67 m.p.h. • 2, Vernet-De Bodard (Riley).

1,100 o.e. : 1, Mollinad-Allahl (Mum-Plat), 60.57 m.p.h.

750 e.e. : 1, Lapehin-Plantivaux (Shmm-flat), 52.72 m.p.h.

Alfas Fall at Modena

The Circuit of Modena was quite a sensational affair. This is the home-town of the Alfa Corse, and a sweeping victory for the new 1,500 c.c. Alfa-Romeos was predicted. But it didn’t turn out that way. The winner, after 55 hectic twomile laps of ” round the houses ” circuit, was Francesco Cortese, driving a

” Works ” Maserati. Second came Armand Hug, the Swiss driver of a Maserati, who always seems to be in the first three these days, and third was the Englishman, Arthur Dobson, who thus atoned for his unfortunate retirement at Monza.

The race was run at a furious pace at the start, which caused fifteen Of the nineteen starters to retire, including the complete team of Alfas.

RESULT 1. Cortese (Maserati), Iii. 43m. 54.00., 63.08

1. Cortese (Maserati), Iii. 43m. 54.00., 63.08 m.p.h.

2. Rug (Maserati), 54 laps.

3. Dobson (E.R.A.), 52 laps.

4. Plate (Maserati), 48 laps.

You may also like

Related products