U.S. FIRST WITH TWO-STAGE?

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U.S. FIRST WITH TWO-STAGE?

Sir,

I have just read an excellent article in MOTOR SPORT, February, 1948, entitled “The Trend of Racing Car Design,” and in the interests of historical technical accuracy I would like the opportunity of correcting a mis-statement. The text reads : “Two-stage supercharging, first introduced by MercedesBenz in 1939.” Actually-, two-stage supercharging was developed in the U.S.A. as early as 1927, by Dr. Moss, of the General Electric Co., in conjunction with Tommy Milton. The car was a modified Miller and was prepared for the 1927 Indianapolis race, though the ” bugs ” were not ironed out till the following year, when it was eliminated at the 850-mile mark with a broken rod. The two centrifugal blowers were built as a single mit, which resulted in a very compact and neat installation. I believe the pressure developed at an engine speed of

7,800 r.p.m. was 28 lb. (A.B.S.). An excellent photo of the arrangement appeared in “The Motor Age” and was reproduced in Floyd Clymer’s “Indianapolis Race History.”

Wishing your journal continued success. I am, Yours, etc.,

ERIC H. PRICE.

Melbourne, Australia.

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