"B.R.M. -AMBASSADOR FOR BRITAIN"

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” .R.M.-AhIBASSADOR FOR BRITAI N ” (Daily Express, 2s. 6d.).

This booklet could have been a splendid bit of propaganda for motor-racing in general and the B.R.M. in particular, and the Daily Express deserves credit for its production. Until the car it eulogises gets cracking it must remain merely a souvenir. The contents embrace a foreword by Earl Howe, a frontispiece showing Royalty inspecting ,the B.R.M., Basil Cardew’s story of the B.R.M.’ Peter Watson’s explanation of Grand Prix racing, Laurence Pomeroy’s simple-language technical survey of why racing cars are designed as they are (very readable, this), and George Monkhouse’s illustrated account of Grand Prix racing from 1895 to 1950. The whole booklet is lavishly illustrated, including a colour plate of the B.R.M. as it ought to have gone on August 26th, and drawings of Silverstone and the Nurburg Ring. Curiously, the only error we stopped is one we made ourselves in MOTOR SPORT during the war —that of attributing the 1923 Grand Prix victory to a supercharged Sunbeam, whereas these 2-litre cars were not supercharged.—W. B.

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