RUMBLINGS, October 1951

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56

RUMBLINGS

Congratulations to LL-Col. A. T. ” Collie ” Gardner on his new International Class I records, not to mention ten American records. Ile used a virtually standard ” TI) ” Bravo “Goldie! M.G. Midget engine, .aided by a Shorrock supercharger, in his M.G., as we reported in the August issue. The new records are as follows (previous holder in brackets)

The hour record is a magnificent achievement, especially as Gardner, aiming at an ambitions 140 m.p.h., had to hold 0,200 r.p.m. instead of the pre-arranged 5,500 r.p.m., which, caused the oil temperature to exceed 100 degrees C and an oil pipe to break. Gardner had to cut. out on the last, of his 10-mile circuits of the Utah Salt Flats and coast in neutral for 3:1 miles ! Incidentally, his American records include the fs. 50 and one-hour, set to 184.7 and 113913 m.p.h., respectively, beating the old hour record by over 73 m.p.h.!

The timing gear failed and the rains came before Gardner could attempt to raise his own Class F short-distance records. But what matter—he already holds the flying kilo, mile and five kilos honours, at over 200 m.p.h. His latest bid is a line example of British achievement, backed by the able Nuffield Organisation. Amongst the components which contributed to this M.G. success were Lucas ignition, Ferodo clutch and brake linings, Dunlop tyres Cam Gears steering, Tempered Spring Co. valve springs, Andre shack-absorbers, Smiths instruments, Lodge plugs, Ki-gass starting and Duckham’s oil.

Two days later D. Van Osten, sponsored by Motor Trend. established 23 American stock-car records at the same course, from 25 kilos to 1,000 kilos, driving a standard ” TD ” M.G. Midget. taken from a Salt Lake City showroom only a few hours before. The run lasted 12 hours, at; an average of 75.34 m.p.h., and the M.G. stopped only four times. Motoring enthusiasts have been likened to fanatics and this may well be true, particularly of those who take their hobby into their homes, thus exasperating wives

In the Home and girl friends. Into their homes ?

crankcases and gearboxes stowed in drawing rooms or under the bed . . . 13nt what we really bad in mind were those. bright persons who create the right ” atmosphere ” by ingenious means—a door knocker cunningly contrived from a piston crown and a pivoted con.-rod, a lamp standard that is an ill-disguised inverted steering wheel and column, that magneto acting as a gas-lighter, hot-water radiators that are just: that (!), and electric fires similarly adapted. There was that horror, the bulb horn with Edwardian flexible extension in lieu of a conventional door bell, and one acquaintance threatened to buy a vintage car, install a crystal receiver, generate his own electricity and read no newspaper or journal dated later than the early ‘twenties. We have net heard from hint of late, so perhaps .

Less expressive, but also less troublesome., are paper weights made front old valves, ash trays front cut-down pistons, and certainly no one will object., not even the wives, to motoring items of wearing apparel such as Chit) pullovers, scarves, and ties (who pioneered the Club tie ? The Bugatti 0.C. was early in the field with its beautiful blue and aoba silk tie and the blue V.S.C.C. tie with badge in white is N’ery popular these days/. No, the feminine element surely can’t mind these things–after all, they can retaliate by wearing one of those delight lid ” Road NVheels ” silk squares by Jacqmar.

There is also the decoration of study or drawing room with good photographs or drawings of drivers and their ears, and with ” Dinkie ” miniatures and other car models.

Before we leave this Untie, if you Rave int roduced an unusual ” motoring item ” into your home that might intrigue fellow nthusiasts, please drop us a p.c. about it. The contest for the Trophy donated by A. A. 13aring and the Moron SPORT £50 cash prize worked out very well. The rules

The MOTOR SPORT Silverstone Trophy

were published in the May issue and were devised so that the winner should be a driver and car consistently successful at a Club Silverstone rave meeting. The accompanying table shows how I). Margulies and his very rapid Talbot 105 [they now tell me it under-steers

built up a commanding lead on points until the S.U.N.B.A.C. Meeting. Here he ran with a stiff new engine and was unplaced, so D. J. R. Chapman, winning his second race in his two-seater 41-litre Bentley, got Within 1 point. It was now that the point of our rather vomplex rules became apparent, for Margulies could only run again if he could qualify in one of the handicaps at the M.( .CMeeting. lie made a gallant attempt to do so but, his engine stiff, finished seventh, whereas only the first four qualified. He had been passed by two XI: 120s which started 10 sec. after the Talbot. Hard lack !

The interest still held, for, unplaced, Margulies nevertheless retained his 1 point lead. Chapman would need to finish sixth in the Final to tic, higher than this to win. As it, was he drove magnificently, snieking third gear in silently for Stowe corner, and won comfortably at 68.01 m.p.h., thus gaining a farther 6 points, a total of 20 to Margulies’ 21. NV;irm congratulations !

And our thanks to all those clubs which co-operated in running the contest.

Whether we can call this Trophy the ” SilverstOne ” Trophy next season is unknown at present, but certainly it, and the MoTon Svoter Brooklands Memorial Trophy—won under even more exciting eotalitions by Hawthorn and his Riley at Goodwood last August–will be put up again next. year.

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