RUMBLINGS, October 1953

Author

admin

Browse pages
Current page

1

Current page

2

Current page

3

Current page

4

Current page

5

Current page

6

Current page

7

Current page

8

Current page

9

Current page

10

Current page

11

Current page

12

Current page

13

Current page

14

Current page

15

Current page

16

Current page

17

Current page

18

Current page

19

Current page

20

Current page

21

Current page

22

Current page

23

Current page

24

Current page

25

Current page

26

Current page

27

Current page

28

Current page

29

Current page

30

Current page

31

Current page

32

Current page

33

Current page

34

Current page

35

Current page

36

Current page

37

Current page

38

Current page

39

Current page

40

Current page

41

Current page

42

Current page

43

Current page

44

Current page

45

Current page

46

Current page

47

Current page

48

Current page

49

Current page

50

Current page

51

Current page

52

Current page

53

Current page

54

Current page

55

Current page

56

Current page

57

Current page

58

Current page

59

Current page

60

RUMBLINGS

Britain’s battle-of-the-babies, referred to editorially this month, warmed up when Sir John Black released details of his new 8-h.p. Standard on September 14th, the 50th anal THE NEW versary of the Standard Motor Co. Ltd. STANDARD EIGHT Previous to this the economy-car market was

restrieted to the Ford Anglia, obsolete this year, the Morris Minor and Austin A30 sharing the same 800-c.c. o.h.v. engine, and the French-conceived Renault 750.

Standard have long been interested in economy cars. Before the Kaiser ” gurfuffie ” their 9.5-h.p. light car was a substantial success. After the Armistice they brought out, but scarcely proceeded with, a low-built Eight and in 1927 revived flagging fortunes with a very compact, lively and well-equipped worm-drive Nine, which developed into the Big and Little Nines and subsequent staunch Tens. In 1939 the new Standard Eight arrived, with then-modern lines, a decidedly willing 1-litre engine that propelled this smart little car at 60 m.p.h., and independent front suspension. So the Canley Works are not strangers to the requirements of economy-car purchasers.

The new Eight, which is really a Nine because it is rated at 8.3 h.p. under the old R.A.C. horsepower rating, is of thoroughly sound and conventional specification. Thus it has a four-cylinder water-cooled 58 ram. by 76 mm., 803-c.c. o.h.v. engine looking like a scaled-down Vanguard unit. The valves are operated by push-rods and rockers from a chain-driven camshaft, there are 40-ton steel connecting rods, a balanced crankshaft running in three main bearings, and pump cooling, circulating seven pints of water. The sump holds seven pinta of oil, which is circulated, via a Purolator by-pass cleaner, by a Hobourn-Eaton high-capacity oil pump. With a compression ratio of 7.25 to 1 and Solex d.d. carburetter the output is 26 b.h.p. at 4,500 r.p.m., and maximum torque of 470 lb./in. is developed at 2,800 r.p.m.

The drive goes through a 64-in. diameter Borg and Beek clutch to a unit four-speed gearbox with ratios of 20.9, 11.9, 7.0 and 4.9 to 1, there being synchromesh on all except bottom cog. The open propeller-shaft drives a hypoid back axle. There is wishbone i.f.s. and 7-in. diameter Girling hydraulic brakes.

The body is a four-door saloon, Bonderised and dust-proofed, and the wheelbase is 7 ft. in., the track 4 ft. ot in., and this new Standard Eight runs on 5.20-13 tyres. It hes separate front seats and a divan-type back seat which folds away when required to provide extra luggage space. These seats are Tygan upholstered. The facia contains one dial, shielded from dazzle, combining the functions of speedometer, oil warning, ignition warning and fuel gauge. There is a very large (but lidless) luggage boot (it being assumed that purchasers of people’s cars go about with at least nine expensive cases full of changes of wearing apparel), and a parcels. shelf under the facia. The fuel capacity is seven gallons, suggesting a range of at least 290 miles.

Altogether, this is a most attractive infant. Standards claim for it 0-50 m.p.h. in 25 seconds, a maximum speed of 62 m.p.h., and a fuel consumption ranging from 55 m.p.g. at a steady 30 m.p.h. to 40 m.p.g. at a steady 50 m.p.h. It is geared to do 13.3 m.p.h. per 1,000 r.p.m. in top gear, and when flat-out the critical piston speed of 2,500 f.p.m. has not been reached by a clear 180 r.p.m.

We give Full Marks to Standard for having the spare wheel in a compartment separate from the luggage boot, making the wings. easily replaceable if damaged, providing four doors, arranging for extra luggage space by folding away the back seats and for making air-conditioning and heating, radio, openable back window, wheel nave plates, tool roll, second screen visor, second screen-wiper blade, over-riders and a roof rack optional extras. By so doing this new Standard Eight becomes, at a price of £481 7s. 6d. inclusive of purchase tax, the lowest-priced British car with the exception of the Ford Anglia (soon to be replaced), which was £36 cheaper. It is £23 cheaper than the less-roomy Austin A30, £93 less expensive than the Morris Minor four-door saloon.

The new Standard looks like a splendid attempt to offer a modern, brisk-performance small car at a highly competitive price. We said editorially (page 519) that we would he disappointed if it had an engine exceeding about 600 c.c. and weighed more than about 11 cwt. It actually weighs 14 cwt. ready for the road and, while acclaiming it as an excellent example of the present British conception of an economy car we would guess the average fuel consumption to be 42/43 m.p.g.), it looks as if the 2CV Citroen will be Earls Court’s only real baby. **** ** eseo.so04.4*+ ***** .4-4….5.4#4,..••••••••• ****** see•eoe+4,••